Finance Managers plan, organise, direct, control and coordinate the financial and accounting activities within organisations.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job. Around three quarters of workers have a university degree.

Tasks

  • determining, implementing, monitoring, reviewing and evaluating budgetary and accounting strategies, policies and plans in consultation with other Managers
  • providing financial information and interpreting the implications for business performance and funding needs
  • coordinating the development, implementation and monitoring of accounting systems
  • directing the preparation of financial reports summarising and forecasting the organisation's financial position such as income statements, balance sheets and analyses of future earnings and income
  • assessing capital finance proposals and the financial status of operational projects
  • advising on investment strategies, sources of funds and the distribution of earnings
  • delivering long range profit forecasts, budgeting and financial reporting
  • ensuring compliance with financial legislation and standards

Job Titles

  • Finance Manager
  • Finance Manager (also called Chief Financial Officer, Finance Director, or Financial Controller)

    Specialisations: Financial Administrator

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $2,073 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    strong
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    64600
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    59.4%
  • Female Share

    40.6%
  • Full-Time Share

    88.3%

Find Vacancies

This is a very large occupation employing 64,600 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
Strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create more than 50,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Finance Managers work in most parts of Australia.
  • They work in many industries. Some of the main industries are: Financial and Insurance Services; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Manufacturing.
  • Full-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 41.1 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $2,073 per week (very high compared to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 44 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 6 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200543100
200649400
200753700
200844700
200945500
201044500
201154000
201247500
201347700
201451200
201564600
202075300

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsFinance ManagersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings20731230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryFinance ManagersAll Jobs Average
Full-time88.368.4
Part-time11.731.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)41.140

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Financial and Insurance Services20.1
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services13.3
Manufacturing8.7
Public Administration and Safety8.2
Other Industries49.7

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateFinance ManagersAll Jobs Average
NSW36.131.8
VIC30.625.5
QLD14.519.8
SA6.36.8
WA6.211.2
TAS1.22
NT11.1
ACT4.21.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketFinance ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.6-5.45.4
20-240.8-9.99.9
25-3418.4-23.423.4
35-4431.1-21.721.7
45-5427-21.121.1
55-5911.5-8.78.7
60-648.9-5.95.9
65 and Over1.7-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryFinance ManagersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males59.4Males53.6
Females40.6Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationFinance ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate23.5-8.68.6
Bachelor degree48.7-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma7.1-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV3-18.918.9
Year 1211.2-18.718.7
Years 11 & 106.5-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job.
Around three quarters of workers have a university degree.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Finance Managers who can communicate clearly, have strong interpersonal skills and pay attention to detail.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Economics and Accounting

    96% Important

    Economics and accounting, the financial markets, banking and checking and reporting of financial data.

  2. Administration and Management

    84% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  3. Mathematics

    80% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  4. English Language

    79% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Law and Government

    71% Important

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

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Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    93% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  2. Getting Information

    91% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Analyzing Data or Information

    90% Important

    Looking at, working with, and understanding data or information.

  4. Processing Information

    90% Important

    Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or checking information or data.

  5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    87% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Occupational Information Network Treasurers and Controllers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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