Air Transport Professionals fly and navigate aircraft, control and direct air traffic to ensure the safe and efficient operation of aircraft in flight and on the ground, and instruct students in flying aircraft.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Around two in five workers have a university degree. Aeroplane and Helicopter Pilots require a minimum amount of flying experience in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing is mandatory.

Tasks

  • preparing and submitting flight plans giving consideration to factors such as weather conditions and aircraft performance
  • flying aircraft in accordance with established air traffic control and aircraft operating procedures
  • providing flight information for flight crews and air traffic services staff
  • controlling aircraft movements, and directing aircraft taxiing, take-offs and landings by radio
  • providing pre-flight briefings and aeronautical information services
  • completing cockpit preparations and external inspections to determine that aircraft are acceptable for flight
  • monitoring aircraft performance and reporting on mechanical condition
  • giving in-flight instruction, supervising solo flights, accompanying students on training flights and demonstrating techniques for controlling aircraft

Job Titles

  • Aeroplane Pilot
  • Air Traffic Controller
  • Flying Instructor
  • Helicopter Pilot
  • Other Air Transport Professionals
  • Aeroplane Pilot

    Flies aeroplanes to transport passengers, mail and freight, or provide agricultural, aerial surveillance or other aviation services. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Air Traffic Controller

    Ensures the safe and efficient movement of aircraft in controlled airspace and aerodromes by directing aircraft movements. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Flying Instructor

    Teaches the theory and practical skills of flying aircraft. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Gliding Pilot Instructor, Helicopter Pilot Instructor

  • Helicopter Pilot

    Flies helicopters to transport passengers, mail or freight, or provide agricultural, aviation or aerial surveillance services. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Other Air Transport Professionals

    Includes Aircraft Navigator, Airworthiness Inspector, Balloonist, Flight Engineer Inspector. Registration or licensing is required.

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    decline
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    13200
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    87.5%
  • Female Share

    12.5%
  • Full-Time Share

    78.3%

Find Vacancies

This is a medium sized occupation employing 13,200 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen slightly.
A fall in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Queensland and theNorthern Territory have a large share of Air Transport Professionals.
  • They mainly work in: Transport, Postal and Warehousing; Education and Training; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Full-time work is common. Full-time workers, on average, work 38.0 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The average age is 44 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200511300
20068900
200711700
200810200
200910000
201013900
201114000
201215100
201314400
201413300
201513200
202012200

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryAir Transport ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
Full-time78.368.4
Part-time21.731.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)3840

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Transport, Postal and Warehousing73
Education and Training12.5
Public Administration and Safety9.1
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing2.6
Other Industries2.8

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateAir Transport ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
NSW25.931.8
VIC18.725.5
QLD34.719.8
SA46.8
WA6.811.2
TAS1.22
NT6.51.1
ACT2.21.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketAir Transport ProfessionalsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-244.7-9.99.9
25-3425.8-23.423.4
35-4423.7-21.721.7
45-5419.1-21.121.1
55-5913.6-8.78.7
60-647.4-5.95.9
65 and Over5.7-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryAir Transport ProfessionalsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males87.5Males53.6
Females12.5Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job.
Around two in five workers have a university degree. Aeroplane and Helicopter Pilots require a minimum amount of flying experience in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing is mandatory.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Air Transport Professionals who work well in a team, can communicate clearly and are reliable.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Transportation

    95% Important

    Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

  2. Geography

    81% Important

    Describing land, sea, and air, including their physical characteristics, locations, how they work together, and the location of plant, animal, and human life.

  3. Mathematics

    80% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  4. English Language

    74% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Computers and Electronics

    73% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    97% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  2. Controlling Machines and Processes

    95% Important

    Operate machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

  3. Getting Information

    95% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    93% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  5. Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings

    93% Important

    Checking objects, actions, or events, keeping an eye out for problems.

Occupational Information Network Aircraft Cargo Handling Supervisors Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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