Vending Machine Attendants stock and maintain vending and amusement machines and collect money from coin boxes.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.

Tasks

  • loading, unloading and transporting stock and equipment
  • replenishing vending machines with stock
  • clearing money from machines, accounting for money collected, and checking monitoring systems
  • keeping stock records, and machine maintenance and repair records
  • may test vending machines' dispensing, coin-handling, electrical, refrigeration, carbonation and ice-making systems
  • may adjust and repair vending machines and replace defective mechanical and electrical parts using hand tools and soldering-irons

Job Titles

  • Vending Machine Attendant
  • Vending Machine Attendant (also called Vending Machine Refiller)

    Specialisations: Poker Machine Attendant

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    decline
  • Skill Level

    High School or Certificate I
  • Employment Size

    5200
  • Unemployment

    above average
  • Male Share

    36.4%
  • Female Share

    63.6%
  • Full-Time Share

    42.7%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 5200 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has stayed about the same.
A fall in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Victoria and Queensland have a large share of Vending Machine Attendants.
  • They mainly work in: Accommodation and Food Services; Arts and Recreation Services; and Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services.
  • Part-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 38.4 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The average age is 39 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Around 2 in 10 workers are young (aged 15 to 25 years).
  • Around 6 in 10 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was above average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20055200
20067300
20076300
20085500
20095700
20105200
20115400
20126600
20135000
20145800
20155200
20204800

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryVending Machine AttendantsAll Jobs Average
Full-time42.768.4
Part-time57.331.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)38.440

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Accommodation and Food Services73.8
Arts and Recreation Services17.1
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services3.2
Manufacturing3
Other Industries2.9

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateVending Machine AttendantsAll Jobs Average
NSW23.231.8
VIC40.425.5
QLD27.519.8
SA4.86.8
WA011.2
TAS1.42
NT1.51.1
ACT1.31.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketVending Machine AttendantsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-2420.6-9.99.9
25-3426-23.423.4
35-4410.7-21.721.7
45-5424-21.121.1
55-596.6-8.78.7
60-649.1-5.95.9
65 and Over3-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryVending Machine AttendantsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males36.4Males53.6
Females63.6Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

  • myfuture (login required) and the Good Education Group provide information about courses at all levels.
  • My Skills is the national directory of Vocational Education and Training (VET) and provides information about nationally recognised training and training providers that deliver it.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Vending Machine Attendants who are reliable and work well as part of a team.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    79% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. English Language

    78% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Mathematics

    73% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  4. Public Safety and Security

    70% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  5. Mechanical

    67% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Occupational Information Network Coin, Vending, and Amusement Machine Servicers and Repairers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    92% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  2. Handling and Moving Objects

    90% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  3. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    90% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  4. Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment

    90% Important

    Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing mechanical machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment.

  5. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    89% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

Occupational Information Network Coin, Vending, and Amusement Machine Servicers and Repairers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

go to top