Aquaculture Farmers plan, organise, control, coordinate and perform farming operations to breed and raise fish and other aquatic stock.

At least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job (that's a skill level equal to a Bachelor Degree or higher).

Tasks

  • planning and coordinating the operation of hatcheries to produce fish fry, seed oysters, crayfish, marron and prawns taking into account environmental and market factors
  • monitoring the environment to maintain optimal growing conditions
  • identifying and controlling environmental toxins and diseases
  • monitoring stock growth rates to determine when to harvest
  • transporting fish, crayfish, marron, prawns and sticks of seed oysters to new tanks, ponds, cages and floating net pens
  • directing and overseeing the harvesting, grading and packaging of fish, oysters and other aquatic stock
  • organising the sale, purchase and transportation of fish stock
  • maintaining and evaluating records of farming activities, monitoring market activity and planning production accordingly
  • managing business capital including budgeting, taxation, debt and loan management
  • may select, train and supervise staff and contractors

Job Titles

  • Aquaculture or Marine Farmer
  • Aquaculture or Marine Farmer

    Specialisations: Seafood Farmer, Fish Farmer, Hatchery Manager (Fish), Mussel Farmer, Oyster Farmer

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    moderate
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    2200
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    78.0%
  • Female Share

    22.0%
  • Full-Time Share

    54.8%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 2200 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen.
Moderate growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Tasmania and Western Australia have a large share of Aquaculture Farmers.
  • They mainly work in: Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing; Retail Trade; and Wholesale Trade.
  • Part-time work is fairly common, but more than half work full-time. Full-time workers, on average, work 44.3 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The workforce is fairly mature. The average age is 52 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Around 3 in 10 workers are young (aged 15 to 25 years) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 8 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20051900
20061100
20071300
20082500
20091400
20102900
20112000
20121000
20132300
20142000
20152200
20202300

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryAquaculture FarmersAll Jobs Average
Full-time54.868.4
Part-time45.231.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)44.340

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing89.8
Retail Trade5.2
Wholesale Trade3.9
Manufacturing1
Other Industries0.1

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateAquaculture FarmersAll Jobs Average
NSW20.831.8
VIC5.225.5
QLD19.819.8
SA66.8
WA24.711.2
TAS21.72
NT1.81.1
ACT01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketAquaculture FarmersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-196.7-5.45.4
20-2420.8-9.99.9
25-346.3-23.423.4
35-4412.5-21.721.7
45-5411.1-21.121.1
55-5912.4-8.78.7
60-641-5.95.9
65 and Over29.2-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryAquaculture FarmersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males78Males53.6
Females22Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

At least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job (that's a skill level equal to a Bachelor Degree or higher).

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Aquaculture Farmers who work well in a team, communicate clearly and who are reliable.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Biology

    82% Important

    Plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, how they rely on and work with each other and the environment.

  2. Administration and Management

    76% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  3. English Language

    73% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Production and Processing

    73% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  5. Mathematics

    69% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

Occupational Information Network Aquacultural Managers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work

    88% Important

    Deciding on goals and putting together a detailed plan to get the work done.

  2. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    87% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  3. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    85% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  4. Scheduling Work and Activities

    85% Important

    Working out the timing of events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

  5. Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others

    83% Important

    Getting a group of people to work together to finish a task.

Occupational Information Network Aquacultural Managers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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