Forestry and Logging Workers perform routine tasks associated in cultivating and maintaining natural and plantation forests, and logging, felling and sawing trees. Tree Surgeons not included here, they are included under Gardeners.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary. Registration or licensing may also be required.

Tasks

  • maintaining forest roads, buildings, facilities, signs and equipment
  • killing weeds, felling and de-barking non-productive trees and thinning young plantations
  • collecting seeds, and cultivating and planting seedlings for reafforestation purposes
  • applying fertilisers, insecticides and herbicides to individual trees and general forest areas
  • maintaining look-out for fires in forests
  • removing major branches and tree tops, trimming branches and sawing trunks into logs
  • assisting with loading and transporting logs
  • planning the felling of trees and determining the natural and intended fall of each tree
  • clearing surrounding area of saplings and debris prior to tree-felling
  • operating and maintaining manual and machine saws to fell trees and to cut felled trees into logs

Job Titles

  • Forestry Worker
  • Logging Assistant, or Logger
  • Tree Faller, or Tree Feller
  • Forestry Worker

    Assists with cultivating, maintaining and protecting forests. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Fire Lookout, Forestry Tree Pruner, Tree Planter

  • Logging Assistant, or Logger

    Assists with logging, felling and sawing of trees in forests.

    Specialisations: Sleeper Cutter

  • Tree Faller, or Tree Feller

    Fells trees in forests, and trims and saws them into logs. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Hardwood Faller, Softwood Faller

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    decline
  • Skill Level

    Certificate II or III
  • Employment Size

    2700
  • Unemployment

    above average
  • Male Share

    90.5%
  • Female Share

    9.5%
  • Full-Time Share

    87.2%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 2700 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen slightly.
A fall in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Tasmania and South Australia have a large share of Forestry and Logging Workers.
  • They mainly work in: Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing; Administrative and Support Services; and Manufacturing.
  • Full-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 40.1 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The workforce is fairly young. The average age is 29 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Around 2 in 10 workers are young (aged 15 to 25 years).
  • More than 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was above average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20052000
20063500
20073900
20084100
20094000
20103000
20112900
20122400
20132600
20142000
20152700
20202600

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryForestry and Logging WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-time87.268.4
Part-time12.831.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)40.140

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing75.1
Administrative and Support Services14.3
Manufacturing3.8
Public Administration and Safety3
Other Industries3.8

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateForestry and Logging WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW13.431.8
VIC27.325.5
QLD18.319.8
SA15.16.8
WA7.111.2
TAS13.62
NT2.41.1
ACT2.81.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketForestry and Logging WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-199.1-5.45.4
20-2411.3-9.99.9
25-3436.9-23.423.4
35-442-21.721.7
45-5415.7-21.121.1
55-5918.8-8.78.7
60-641.7-5.95.9
65 and Over4.5-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryForestry and Logging WorkersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males90.5Males53.6
Females9.5Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary. Registration or licensing may also be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Forestry and Logging Workers who are reliable, hardworking and physically fit.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Mechanical

    79% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  2. Public Safety and Security

    56% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  3. Production and Processing

    52% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  4. Administration and Management

    49% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  5. Transportation

    49% Important

    Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

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Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Controlling Machines and Processes

    87% Important

    Operate machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

  2. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    84% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  3. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    78% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  4. Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment

    77% Important

    Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing mechanical machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment.

  5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    73% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Occupational Information Network Forest and Conservation Workers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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