Other Construction and Mining Labourers includes occupations such as Crane Chasers, Driller's Assistants, Laggers, Mining Support Workers and Surveyor's Assistants.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job. Sometimes additional tickets are also required to work in this job.

Tasks

  • slings cranes and winches, and directs the movement of loads ensuring loads do not exceed lifting capacities
  • performs routine tasks in setting up, operating and dismantling drilling sites for extracting oil, gas, mineral ore or water
  • applies insulating materials, such as felt, fibreglass, polyurethane and cork, to pipes, steam generators, process vats and ducting, and secures insulation with wire, wire netting, staples, metal strapping and using welding torches
  • performs routine tasks in mining and mineral ore treating operations such as assembling, operating and dismantling mining equipment, taking ore, rock and dust samples, and mixing ore treating chemicals and catalysts
  • performs routine tasks to assist surveyors and geologists by transporting, assembling, maintaining and laying out prospecting and surveying equipment, and collecting and labelling samples

Job Titles

  • Crane Chaser
  • Driller's Assistant
  • Lagger
  • Mining Support Worker
  • Surveyor's Assistant
  • Crane Chaser

    Slings cranes and winches, and directs the movement of loads ensuring loads do not exceed lifting capacities.

    Specialisations: Dogman/woman, Slinger

  • Driller's Assistant (also called Driller's Offsider or Roustabout (Oil and Gas))

    Performs routine tasks in setting up, operating and dismantling drilling sites for extracting oil, gas, mineral ore or water.

    Specialisations: Derrick Hand, Roughneck, Well Treatment Offsider

  • Lagger

    Applies insulating materials, such as felt, fibreglass, polyurethane and cork, to pipes, steam generators, process vats and ducting, and secures insulation with wire, wire netting, staples, metal strapping and using welding torches.

  • Mining Support Worker (also called Mineral Ore Processing Labourer)

    Performs routine tasks in mining and mineral ore treating operations such as assembling, operating and dismantling mining equipment, taking ore, rock and dust samples, and mixing ore treating chemicals and catalysts.

    Specialisations: Pit Crew Support Worker

  • Surveyor's Assistant

    Performs routine tasks to assist Surveyors and Geologists by transporting, assembling, maintaining and laying out prospecting and surveying equipment, and collecting and labelling samples.

    Specialisations: Geological Survey Field Assistant, Seismic Survey Assistant

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,400 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    moderate
  • Skill Level

    High School or Certificate I
  • Employment Size

    6,800
  • Unemployment

    above average
  • Male Share

    95.9%
  • Female Share

    4.1%
  • Full-Time Share

    90.4%

Find Vacancies

This is a small occupation employing 6800 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen slightly.
Moderate growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Queensland and Western Australia have a large share of Other Construction and Mining Labourers.
  • They mainly work in: Mining; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Construction.
  • Full-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 45.9 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,400 per week (higher than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The workforce is fairly young. The average age is 32 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Around 3 in 10 workers are young (aged 15 to 25 years).
  • More than 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was above average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20057500
20066800
20079200
20088500
20098200
20107100
20119100
20128700
20138300
20144400
20156800
20207100

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsOther Construction and Mining LabourersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings14001230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther Construction and Mining LabourersAll Jobs Average
Full-time90.468.4
Part-time9.631.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)45.940.0

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Mining44.1
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services23.0
Construction18.6
Public Administration and Safety6.7
Other Industries7.6

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateOther Construction and Mining LabourersAll Jobs Average
NSW14.631.8
VIC11.225.5
QLD40.519.8
SA2.36.8
WA26.711.2
TAS1.62.0
NT0.41.1
ACT2.71.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketOther Construction and Mining LabourersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-191.8-5.45.4
20-2427.1-9.99.9
25-3430.8-23.423.4
35-4417.5-21.721.7
45-5413.0-21.121.1
55-594.9-8.78.7
60-642.0-5.95.9
65 and Over2.9-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther Construction and Mining LabourersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males95.9Males53.6
Females4.1Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job. Sometimes additional tickets are also required to work in this job.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Construction and Mining Labourers who are reliable, hardworking and can work independently.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Law and Government

    63% Important

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

  2. Public Safety and Security

    62% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  3. Mechanical

    61% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  4. Education and Training

    55% Important

    Teaching and course design.

  5. Production and Processing

    54% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    88% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  2. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    88% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  3. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    85% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  4. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    85% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  5. Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings

    83% Important

    Checking objects, actions, or events, keeping an eye out for problems.

Occupational Information Network Surveying Technicians Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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