Graphic Pre-Press Trades Workers manipulate, set and compose text and graphics into a format suitable for printing and other visual media.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification.

Tasks

  • operating graphic cameras and other photographic equipment to reproduce camera-ready copy onto films, plates and digital output devices
  • using computer applications to generate images, text, layouts and impositions for print and other visual media displays
  • operating plate making equipment to reproduce images from film to printing plates, digital output devices and presses
  • operating computer screen-based equipment for scanning, colour separation, colour correction, masking, creative design, combining, imposing, retouching, and other processes used to transfer copy to film and produce film for plate, digital output and cylinder productions
  • carrying out digital and chemical proofing from digital systems, and negative and positive films
  • evaluating printed proofs, checking and correcting them for quality
  • preparing and exposing carbon tissue for laying on cylinders by transfer method, and developing images

Job Titles

  • Graphic Pre-press Trades Worker
  • Graphic Pre-press Trades Worker

    Specialisations: Desktop Publishing Operator

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    decline
  • Skill Level

    Certificate III or IV
  • Employment Size

    2400
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    62.4%
  • Female Share

    37.6%
  • Full-Time Share

    52.7%

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This is a very small occupation employing 2,400 workers. The number of workers has fallen over the past 5 years.
Over the next 5 years (to May 2022) the number of workers is expected to fall to 2,300. Around 1,000 job openings are likely over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, New South Wales has a large share of Graphic Pre-press Trades Workers.
  • They mainly work in: Manufacturing; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Information Media and Telecommunications.
  • Part-time work is fairly common, but more than half work full-time
  • The average age is 45 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 6 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20076500
20085900
20092800
20103800
20115000
20122800
20133700
20141600
20153100
20162600
20172400
20222300

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Full-Time and Part-Time Status (% Share) and Average Weekly Hours (Full-Time)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryGraphic Pre-press Trades WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-time52.768.4
Part-time47.431.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)28.340

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing48.5
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services30.3
Information Media and Telecommunications10.5
Retail Trade5.4
Other Industries5.3

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateGraphic Pre-press Trades WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW56.731.8
VIC20.725.5
QLD15.119.8
SA06.8
WA6.811.2
TAS02
NT0.61.1
ACT01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketGraphic Pre-press Trades WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-245.7-9.99.9
25-340-23.423.4
35-4445.9-21.721.7
45-5410.9-21.121.1
55-590.6-8.78.7
60-6436.9-5.95.9
65 and Over0-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryGraphic Pre-press Trades WorkersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males62.4Males53.6
Females37.6Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationGraphic Pre-press Trades WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0-8.68.6
Bachelor degree0-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma0-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV0-18.918.9
Year 120-18.718.7
Years 11 & 100-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Graphic Pre-press Trades Workers who are hardworking, reliable and work well in a team.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Computers and Electronics

    80% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  2. English Language

    73% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Design

    70% Important

    Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

  4. Mathematics

    67% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  5. Production and Processing

    67% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-5111.00 - Prepress Technicians and Workers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Interacting With Computers

    92% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  2. Getting Information

    87% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    83% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  4. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

    83% Important

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

  5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    83% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-5111.00 - Prepress Technicians and Workers.

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