Structural Steel Construction Workers assemble rigging gear to move and position equipment and structural components, erect scaffolding, position and secure steel reinforcing in concrete forms, and erect and dismantle structural steel frames.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Around two in five workers have a Certificate III/IV. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • erecting lifting tackles by attaching pulleys and blocks to fixed overhead structures, and installing cables and attaching counterweights
  • attaching slinging gear to hoisting equipment and objects to be moved using clamps, hooks, bolts and knots
  • fitting and bolting tubes, support braces and components to form bases and build up scaffolding
  • lifting and positioning sections of scaffolding
  • measuring, cutting, bending and fitting welded wire mesh into concrete areas to be mesh-reinforced
  • fixing mesh and reinforcing steel into position in formwork for concrete pours
  • setting up winches and rigging equipment to raise and position girders, plates, columns and other steel units
  • erecting guard rails, guy wires, ropes and clears, laying planks and hanging safety nets

Job Titles

  • Construction Rigger
  • Scaffolder
  • Steel Fixer
  • Structural Steel Erector
  • Construction Rigger

    Assembles and installs rigging gear, such as cables, ropes, pulleys and winches, to lift, lower, move and position equipment, structural steel and other heavy objects. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Scaffolder

    Erects and dismantles scaffolding to provide work platforms on building and industrial sites, and for temporary structures such as staging and seating. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Steel Fixer

    Positions and secures steel bars and steel mesh in concrete forms to reinforce concrete structures. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Structural Steel Erector

    Erects and dismantles structural steel frames of buildings and other structures. Registration or licensing may be required.

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,517 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    very strong
  • Skill Level

    Certificate II or III
  • Employment Size

    22,000
  • Unemployment

    above average
  • Male Share

    99.5%
  • Female Share

    0.5%
  • Full-Time Share

    91.5%

Find Vacancies

This is a medium sized occupation employing 22,000 workers. The number of workers has fallen over the past 5 years.
Over the next 5 years (to May 2022) the number of workers is expected to grow very strongly to 26,300. Around 27,000 job openings are likely over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created (a large number for an occupation of this size).

  • Structural Steel Construction Workers work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Construction; Manufacturing; and Mining.
  • Almost all work full-time. Full-time workers, on average, work 43.0 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,517 per week (higher than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 37 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • More than 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was above average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200718200
200820500
200924800
201017700
201124800
201223900
201324700
201425100
201526000
201623500
201722000
202226300

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsStructural Steel Construction WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings15171230

Hours

Full-Time and Part-Time Status (% Share) and Average Weekly Hours (Full-Time)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryStructural Steel Construction WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-time91.568.4
Part-time8.531.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)4340

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Construction66.4
Manufacturing10
Mining7.4
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services5.7
Other Industries10.5

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateStructural Steel Construction WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW25.931.8
VIC26.625.5
QLD17.819.8
SA6.66.8
WA18.511.2
TAS0.52
NT2.51.1
ACT1.51.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketStructural Steel Construction WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-191.8-5.45.4
20-249.7-9.99.9
25-3432.6-23.423.4
35-4425.8-21.721.7
45-5421.1-21.121.1
55-593.1-8.78.7
60-644.8-5.95.9
65 and Over1-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryStructural Steel Construction WorkersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males99.5Males53.6
Females0.5Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job.
Around two in five workers have a Certificate III/IV. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary. Registration or licensing may be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Structural Steel Construction Workers who are motivated and hardworking.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Building and Construction

    92% Important

    Materials, methods, and the tools used to construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.

  2. Mechanical

    73% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  3. Mathematics

    70% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  4. Public Safety and Security

    66% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  5. Administration and Management

    60% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 47-2221.00 - Structural Iron and Steel Workers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Handling and Moving Objects

    88% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  2. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    85% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  3. Performing General Physical Activities

    83% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

  4. Getting Information

    81% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    80% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 47-2221.00 - Structural Iron and Steel Workers.

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