Child Care Centre Managers plan, organise, direct, control and coordinate the activities of childcare centres and services including physical and human resources.

A skill level equal to Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job. Around two in five workers have a Bachelor Degree.

Tasks

  • developing and implementing programs to enhance the physical, social, emotional and intellectual development of young children
  • providing care for children in before-school, after-school, day, and vacation care centres
  • directing and supervising Child Carers in providing care and supervision for young children
  • ensuring the centre is a safe area for children, staff and visitors
  • complying with relevant government requirements and standards
  • liaising with parents
  • maintaining records and accounts for the centre
  • recruiting staff and coordinating professional development

Job Titles

  • Child Care Centre Manager, Director or Coordinator

    Fast Facts

    • Avg. Weekly Pay

      $1,160 Before Tax
    • Future Growth

      very strong
    • Skill Level

      Bachelor Degree or higher
    • Employment Size

      12900
    • Unemployment

      below average
    • Male Share

      14.9%
    • Female Share

      85.1%
    • Full-Time Share

      75.9%

    Find Vacancies

    This is a medium sized occupation employing 12,900 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
    Very strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

    • Child Care Centre Managers work in most parts of Australia.
    • They mainly work in: Health Care and Social Assistance; Education and Training; and Public Administration and Safety.
    • Full-time work is common. Full-time workers, on average, work 39.1 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
    • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,160 per week (similar to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • The average age is 42 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
    • Around 9 in 10 workers are female.
    • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
    YearNumber of Workers
    20057200
    20067700
    20079700
    200811800
    200911300
    201010100
    201112100
    201211100
    201314600
    201411200
    201512900
    202015800

    Weekly Earnings

    Full-time Earnings

    All Jobs Average

    Weekly Earnings (before tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsChild Care Centre ManagersAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings11601230

    Hours

    Weekly Hours Worked

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
    CategoryChild Care Centre ManagersAll Jobs Average
    Full-time75.968.4
    Part-time24.131.6
    Average Weekly Hours (full-time)39.140

    Main Industries

    Top Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Health Care and Social Assistance70.4
    Education and Training21.3
    Public Administration and Safety4.1
    Arts and Recreation Services3.8
    Other Industries0.4

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateChild Care Centre ManagersAll Jobs Average
    NSW37.531.8
    VIC22.325.5
    QLD20.319.8
    SA7.56.8
    WA10.311.2
    TAS02
    NT1.41.1
    ACT0.61.8

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketChild Care Centre ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-191-5.45.4
    20-245.6-9.99.9
    25-3424.9-23.423.4
    35-4425.2-21.721.7
    45-5419-21.121.1
    55-599-8.78.7
    60-648.4-5.95.9
    65 and Over6.8-3.83.8

    Gender

    Male Share

    Female Share

    Gender (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    CategoryChild Care Centre ManagersCategoryAll Jobs Average
    Males14.9Males53.6
    Females85.1Females46.4

    Education Level

    Top Education Levels

    Highest Level of Education (% share)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    A skill level equal to Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job.
    Around two in five workers have a Bachelor Degree.

    If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
    The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

    It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

    Employers look for Child Care Managers who have strong interpersonal skills, are organised and reliable.

    Knowledge

    The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

    1. Administration and Management

      90% Important

      Planning and coordination of people and resources.

    2. Education and Training

      88% Important

      Teaching and course design.

    3. Customer and Personal Service

      86% Important

      Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    4. English Language

      85% Important

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    5. Psychology

      78% Important

      Human behaviour and performance; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioural and affective disorders.

    Occupational Information Network Education Administrators, Preschool and Child Care Center/Program Opens in a new window
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Activities

    The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

    1. Performing Administrative Activities

      90% Important

      Doing day-to-day office work such as filing and processing paperwork.

    2. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

      86% Important

      Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

    3. Assisting and Caring for Others

      85% Important

      Providing personal assistance, medical attention, or emotional support to people such as co-workers, customers, or patients.

    4. Checking Compliance with Standards

      84% Important

      Deciding whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

    5. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

      83% Important

      Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

    Occupational Information Network Education Administrators, Preschool and Child Care Center/Program Opens in a new window
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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