Librarians develop, organise and manage library services such as collections of information, recreational resources and reader information services.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is usually needed to work in this job. Around three in four workers have a university degree. Sometimes relevant experience or on-the-job training is also needed. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • developing and implementing library and information policies and services
  • examining publications and materials, interviewing publishers' representatives, and consulting with others to select library materials
  • reviewing, evaluating and modifying services in response to user needs
  • providing assistance to clients in accessing library resources
  • managing library systems for recording and organising library holdings, acquisitions and purchases, reader registrations and loan transactions, and supervising indexing, filing and retrieval activities
  • managing inter-library loan systems and information networks
  • undertaking information research activities on behalf of clients
  • selecting, ordering, classifying and cataloguing library and information resources
  • monitoring collection development and culling programs
  • supervising and training other library staff
  • may plan and direct library promotion and outreach activities

Job Titles

  • Librarian
  • Librarian

    Specialisations: Acquisitions Librarian, Audiovisual Librarian, Bibliographer, Cataloguer, Children's Librarian, Corporate Librarian, Legal Librarian, Multicultural Services Librarian, Parliamentary Librarian, Reference Librarian, Special Librarian, Special Needs Librarian

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,492 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    stable
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    8400
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    17.5%
  • Female Share

    82.5%
  • Full-Time Share

    68.7%

Find Vacancies

This is a small occupation employing 8400 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen.
Little change in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Librarians work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Education and Training; Information Media and Telecommunications; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
  • Full-time work is fairly common. Full-time workers, on average, work 35.3 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,492 per week (higher than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The workforce is fairly mature. The average age is 49 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 6 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 8 in 10 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200513500
200612300
200712300
200813700
200913400
201014900
201112600
201214800
201310700
201411300
20158400
20208500

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsLibrariansAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings14921230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryLibrariansAll Jobs Average
Full-time68.768.4
Part-time31.331.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)35.340

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Education and Training44.6
Information Media and Telecommunications34.8
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services7
Public Administration and Safety7
Other Industries6.6

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateLibrariansAll Jobs Average
NSW29.331.8
VIC24.225.5
QLD2219.8
SA5.66.8
WA11.811.2
TAS1.42
NT0.91.1
ACT4.91.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketLibrariansAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-192.5-5.45.4
20-241.6-9.99.9
25-348.6-23.423.4
35-4432-21.721.7
45-5421.9-21.121.1
55-5916.5-8.78.7
60-6415-5.95.9
65 and Over1.8-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryLibrariansCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males17.5Males53.6
Females82.5Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is usually needed to work in this job.
Around three in four workers have a university degree. Sometimes relevant experience or on-the-job training is also needed. Registration or licensing may be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

  • myfuture (login required) and the Good Education Group provide information about courses at all levels.
  • My Skills is the national directory of Vocational Education and Training (VET) and provides information about nationally recognised training and training providers that deliver it.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Librarians who can interact well with a variety of people, provide good customer service and can work independently.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. English Language

    87% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    82% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. Computers and Electronics

    80% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  4. Education and Training

    75% Important

    Teaching and course design.

  5. Clerical

    70% Important

    Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

Occupational Information Network Librarians Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    92% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Interacting With Computers

    86% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  3. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    85% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  4. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    82% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  5. Processing Information

    81% Important

    Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or checking information or data.

Occupational Information Network Librarians Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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