Financial Investment Advisers and Managers develop financial plans for individuals and organisations, and invest and manage funds on their behalf.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is usually needed and half of workers have a university degree. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • interviewing prospective clients to determine financial status and objectives, discussing financial options and developing financial plans and investment strategies
  • monitoring investment performance, and reviewing and revising investment plans based on modified needs and changes in markets
  • recommending and arranging insurance cover for clients
  • arranging to buy and sell stocks and bonds for clients
  • advising on investment strategies, sources of funds and the distribution of earnings
  • setting financial objectives, and developing and implementing strategies for achieving the financial objectives
  • managing funds raised from personal superannuation savings policies and unit trusts
  • assisting in meeting superannuation compliance requirements
  • directing the collection of financial, accounting and investment information and the preparation of budgets, reports, forecasts and statutory returns
  • may refer clients to other organisations to obtain services outlined in financial plans

Job Titles

  • Financial Investment Advisor, or Planning Advisor
  • Financial Investment Manager, or Portfolio Manager
  • Financial Investment Advisor, or Planning Advisor

    Develops and implements financial plans for individuals or organisations, and advises on investment strategies and their taxation implications, securities, insurance, pension plans and real estate. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Financial Investment Manager, or Portfolio Manager

    Invests and manages sums of money and assets on behalf of others over an agreed period of time, in order to generate income and profit. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Superannuation Funds Manager, Unit Trust Manager

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,701 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    stable
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    45,900
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    66.8%
  • Female Share

    33.2%
  • Full-Time Share

    85.3%

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This is a large occupation employing 45,900 workers. The number of workers has grown moderately over the past 5 years.
Over the next 5 years (to May 2022) the number of workers is expected to stay about the same at 47,200. Around 21,000 job openings are likely over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Financial Investment Advisers and Managers work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Financial and Insurance Services; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services.
  • Full-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 40.9 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,701 per week (very high compared to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 43 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 7 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200742500
200841700
200940500
201036400
201146500
201243500
201342400
201447000
201547000
201649600
201745900
202247200

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsFinancial Investment Advisers and ManagersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings17011230

Hours

Full-Time and Part-Time Status (% Share) and Average Weekly Hours (Full-Time)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryFinancial Investment Advisers and ManagersAll Jobs Average
Full-time85.368.4
Part-time14.731.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)40.940

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Financial and Insurance Services83.4
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services7.3
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services2.8
Public Administration and Safety2.1
Other Industries4.4

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateFinancial Investment Advisers and ManagersAll Jobs Average
NSW33.931.8
VIC2825.5
QLD22.619.8
SA5.86.8
WA6.611.2
TAS1.82
NT0.31.1
ACT11.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketFinancial Investment Advisers and ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-242.9-9.99.9
25-3423.1-23.423.4
35-4428-21.721.7
45-5423.8-21.121.1
55-598.5-8.78.7
60-647.3-5.95.9
65 and Over6.3-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryFinancial Investment Advisers and ManagersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males66.8Males53.6
Females33.2Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationFinancial Investment Advisers and ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate20.6-8.68.6
Bachelor degree32.1-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma35.8-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV2.8-18.918.9
Year 128.7-18.718.7
Years 11 & 100-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

A Bachelor Degree or higher is usually needed and half of workers have a university degree. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Financial Investment Advisers and Managers who can communicate clearly, work well in a team and have strong interpersonal skills.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    87% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Economics and Accounting

    86% Important

    Economics and accounting, the financial markets, banking and checking and reporting of financial data.

  3. English Language

    74% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Sales and Marketing

    73% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  5. Administration and Management

    71% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 13-2052.00 - Personal Financial Advisors.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    93% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Checking Compliance with Standards

    90% Important

    Deciding whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

  3. Interacting With Computers

    90% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  4. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    90% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  5. Building Good Relationships

    90% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 13-2052.00 - Personal Financial Advisors.

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