Electronics Engineers design, develop, adapt, install, test and maintain electronic components, circuits and systems used for computer systems, communication systems, entertainment, transport and other industrial applications.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is usually required. Sometimes relevant experience or on-the-job training is also needed. Registration or licensing may also be required.

Tasks

  • designing electronic components, circuits and systems used for computer, communication and control systems, and other industrial applications
  • designing software, especially embedded software, to be used within such systems
  • developing apparatus and procedures to test electronic components, circuits and systems
  • supervising installation and commissioning of computer, communication and control systems, and ensuring proper control and protection methods
  • establishing and monitoring performance and safety standards and procedures for operation, modification, maintenance and repair of such systems
  • designing communications bearers based on wired, optical fibre and wireless communication media
  • analysing communications traffic and level of service, and determining the type of installation, location, layout and transmission medium for communication systems
  • designing and developing signal processing algorithms and implementing these through appropriate choice of hardware and software

Job Titles

  • Electronics Engineer
  • Electronics Engineer

    Specialisations: Communications Engineer (Army)

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    stable
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    3500
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    97.6%
  • Female Share

    2.4%
  • Full-Time Share

    89.5%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 3,500 workers. The number of workers has fallen over the past 5 years.
Over the next 5 years (to May 2022) the number of workers is expected to stay about the same at 3,600. Around 1,000 job openings are likely over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Victoria has a large share of Electronics Engineers.
  • They mainly work in: Manufacturing; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Other Services.
  • Full-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 40.3 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The workforce is fairly mature. The average age is 46 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 6 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • More than 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20075400
20086600
20097200
20106800
20118300
20127400
20138600
20146800
20156000
20166800
20173500
20223600

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Full-Time and Part-Time Status (% Share) and Average Weekly Hours (Full-Time)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryElectronics EngineersAll Jobs Average
Full-time89.568.4
Part-time10.531.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)40.340

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing42.3
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services29.5
Other Services8
Wholesale Trade7.4
Other Industries12.8

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateElectronics EngineersAll Jobs Average
NSW30.831.8
VIC39.325.5
QLD7.519.8
SA9.86.8
WA4.711.2
TAS2.42
NT0.81.1
ACT4.61.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketElectronics EngineersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-240-9.99.9
25-3429.7-23.423.4
35-4413.8-21.721.7
45-5432.8-21.121.1
55-595.9-8.78.7
60-6415.7-5.95.9
65 and Over2.1-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryElectronics EngineersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males97.6Males53.6
Females2.4Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is usually required. Sometimes relevant experience or on-the-job training is also needed. Registration or licensing may also be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Electronics Engineers who can communicate clearly, work well in a team and have strong interpersonal skills.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Engineering and Technology

    98% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  2. Computers and Electronics

    93% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  3. Mathematics

    82% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  4. Design

    81% Important

    Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

  5. Physics

    69% Important

    Physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 17-2072.00 - Electronics Engineers, Except Computer.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Interacting With Computers

    89% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  2. Getting Information

    86% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    85% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  4. Drafting, Laying Out, and Specifying Technical Devices, Parts, and Equipment

    84% Important

    Providing documentation, detailed instructions, drawings, or specifications to tell others about how devices, parts, equipment, or structures are to be fabricated, constructed, assembled, modified, maintained, or used.

  5. Documenting/Recording Information

    82% Important

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 17-2072.00 - Electronics Engineers, Except Computer.

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