Podiatrists prevent, diagnose and treat disorders of the feet.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is usually needed to work in this job. Registration or licensing is required.

Tasks

  • examining patients' feet to determine the nature and extent of conditions, deformities and injuries
  • examining and treating foot disabilities caused by diseases such as diabetes, peripheral vascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis and other neuropathies
  • prescribing and arranging the fabrication of footwear to correct foot abnormalities
  • performing minor surgery to remove and improve abnormal conditions
  • prescribing and fitting replaceable pads, palliative and functional supports and other devices for the protection and correction of foot abnormalities
  • advising patients about continued treatment and foot care
  • may provide rehabilitation services to the physically handicapped
  • may refer patients to or have patients referred from Medical Practitioners

Job Titles

  • Podiatrist
  • Podiatrist

    Specialisations: Aquatic Physiotherapist, Cardiothoracic Physiotherapist, Continence and Women's Health Physiotherapist, Gerentological Physiotherapist, Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist, Neurological Physiotherapist, Occupational Health Physiotherapist, Paediatric Physiotherapist, Sports Physiotherapist

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    very strong
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    4,400
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    71.6%
  • Female Share

    28.4%
  • Full-Time Share

    80.8%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 4400 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
Very strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Victoria has a large share of Podiatrists.
  • They nearly all work in Health Care and Social Assistance.
  • Full-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 46.6 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The average age is 36 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Around 7 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20052000
20062400
20073300
20081200
20091300
20102600
20114500
20123500
20134300
20144000
20154400
20205100

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryPodiatristsAll Jobs Average
Full-time80.868.4
Part-time19.231.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)46.640.0

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Health Care and Social Assistance100.0

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StatePodiatristsAll Jobs Average
NSW26.331.8
VIC41.625.5
QLD20.119.8
SA3.26.8
WA6.911.2
TAS0.62.0
NT0.01.1
ACT1.31.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketPodiatristsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.45.4
20-248.3-9.99.9
25-3431.2-23.423.4
35-4449.4-21.721.7
45-540.0-21.121.1
55-599.7-8.78.7
60-640.0-5.95.9
65 and Over1.3-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryPodiatristsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males71.6Males53.6
Females28.4Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is usually needed to work in this job. Registration or licensing is required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Podiatrists who are caring, compassionate, empathetic and work well in a team.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Medicine and Dentistry

    95% Important

    Diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    86% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. English Language

    86% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Education and Training

    80% Important

    Teaching and course design.

  5. Administration and Management

    72% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

Occupational Information Network Podiatrists Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Assisting and Caring for Others

    97% Important

    Providing personal assistance, medical attention, or emotional support to people such as co-workers, customers, or patients.

  2. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    89% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  3. Documenting/Recording Information

    88% Important

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

  4. Getting Information

    85% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  5. Processing Information

    84% Important

    Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or checking information or data.

Occupational Information Network Podiatrists Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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