Telecommunications Engineering Professionals design, construct, install, service and support telecommunications equipment, systems and facilities.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience, or relevant vendor certification is usually needed. Around four in five workers have a university degree. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification.

Tasks

  • planning, designing, building, configuring and commissioning telecommunications devices, networks and systems, such as voice, radio, two-way, data, microwave, satellite and digital data systems, and ensuring telecommunications systems interconnect with equipment from different manufacturers, service providers and users
  • compiling engineering project proposals to define goals, identify scope, background and need, and ascertain cost of equipment, parts and services
  • evaluating and procuring new products and services from vendors
  • ensuring compliance with laws, regulations, policies and procedures in the provision of telecommunications systems
  • selecting and developing new telecommunications sites by locating sites, filing documents, drawing up documents for approval, drafting construction drawings and following through to approval
  • determining appropriate configurations of telecommunications hardware and software, ensuring desired performance of telecommunications equipment
  • preparing and interpreting specifications, drawings and regulations for the use of telecommunications equipment
  • determining the type and arrangement of circuits, transformers, circuit-breakers, transmission lines and equipment
  • identifying and analysing problems and needs of existing telecommunications systems, such as interference, intelligibility and clarity, to determine the most appropriate means of reducing, eliminating and avoiding current and future problems and improve communications
  • monitoring telecommunications systems to assess need for updates, upgrades, enhancements, preventive maintenance and new systems
  • assessing performance levels of system hardware and software to project future needs, and developing shortand long-terms plans for updating equipment, adding capabilities, enhancing existing systems and providing improved telecommunications

Job Titles

  • Telecommunications Engineer
  • Telecommunications Network Engineer, or Communications Consultant
  • Telecommunications Engineer

    Designs and develops telecommunications systems, devices and products.

  • Telecommunications Network Engineer, or Communications Consultant (also called Communications Specialist (ICT), Telecommunications Consultant, or Telecommunications Specialist)

    Plans, designs, and monitors complex telecommunications networks and associated broadcasting equipment.

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,548 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    very strong
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    12,500
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    82.5%
  • Female Share

    17.5%
  • Full-Time Share

    94.4%

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This is a small occupation employing 12,500 workers. The number of workers has grown very strongly over the past 5 years.
Over the next 5 years (to May 2022) the number of workers is expected to grow very strongly to 15,000. Around 8,000 job openings are likely over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created (a large number for an occupation of this size).

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Victoria and New South Wales have a large share of Telecommunications Engineering Professionals.
  • They mainly work in: Information Media and Telecommunications; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Almost all work full-time. Full-time workers, on average, work 37.0 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,548 per week (higher than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 38 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Around 8 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20078000
200811300
20099300
201010800
201112600
20129900
20137500
20148300
20159800
201610700
201712500
202215000

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsTelecommunications Engineering ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings15481230

Hours

Full-Time and Part-Time Status (% Share) and Average Weekly Hours (Full-Time)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryTelecommunications Engineering ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
Full-time94.468.4
Part-time5.631.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)3740

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Information Media and Telecommunications72.4
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services12.3
Public Administration and Safety7.4
Wholesale Trade2.7
Other Industries5.2

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateTelecommunications Engineering ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
NSW38.531.8
VIC35.625.5
QLD9.619.8
SA2.86.8
WA9.111.2
TAS1.12
NT0.31.1
ACT3.21.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketTelecommunications Engineering ProfessionalsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-243.3-9.99.9
25-3431-23.423.4
35-4436.4-21.721.7
45-5419.4-21.121.1
55-596.3-8.78.7
60-643.3-5.95.9
65 and Over0.4-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryTelecommunications Engineering ProfessionalsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males82.5Males53.6
Females17.5Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience, or relevant vendor certification is usually needed.
Around four in five workers have a university degree. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Telecommunications Engineering Professionals who can communicate clearly, work well in a team and have strong interpersonal skills.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Telecommunications

    97% Important

    Transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    81% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. Computers and Electronics

    80% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  4. English Language

    79% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Administration and Management

    76% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 15-1143.01 - Telecommunications Engineering Specialists.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    90% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Interacting With Computers

    88% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  3. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    88% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  4. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

    87% Important

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

  5. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    83% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 15-1143.01 - Telecommunications Engineering Specialists.

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