Aircraft Maintenance Engineers maintain and repair aircraft structures, and avionic and mechanical systems.

A Certificate III/IV is usually needed to work in this job and three in five workers have this qualification. Training is most commonly through an apprenticeship which combines on-the-job training with the qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • dismantling, inspecting, testing, repairing and reassembling aircraft engines, ancillary motors and engine accessories, electrical systems, and subassemblies of aircraft frames
  • installing electrical circuits and equipment
  • testing aircraft communication equipment, aircraft instrumentation and electronic systems using electronic testing equipment and specialised test apparatus
  • replacing and testing aircraft oxygen system components
  • assembling parts and subassemblies of aircraft frames
  • conducting routine pre-flight inspections of engines, aircraft frames and mechanical systems
  • maintaining records of action taken
  • may manufacture aircraft electrical, instrument and radio hardware components

Job Titles

  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Avionics)
  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Mechanical)
  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Structures)
  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Avionics)

    Inspects, tests, aligns, repairs and installs aircraft electrical and avionic system components. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Electrical), Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Instruments), Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Radio), Avionics Technician (Defence), Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Electrical), Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Instruments), Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Radio)

  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Mechanical)

    Inspects, tests, repairs and installs aircraft hydromechanical and flight system components and aircraft engines, subassemblies and components. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Airframes), Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Engines), Aircraft Technician (Air Force, Army), Aviation Technician Aircraft (Navy), Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Airframes), Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Engines)

  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Structures)

    Inspects, dismantles and reassembles aircraft structures, and repairs and replaces components of aircraft frames. Works with both metal and carbon fibre composite materials. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Aircraft Structural Fitter (Air Force, Army)

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,641 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    decline
  • Skill Level

    Certificate III or IV
  • Employment Size

    9800
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    98.3%
  • Female Share

    1.7%
  • Full-Time Share

    99.8%

Find Vacancies

This is a small occupation employing 9800 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen.
A fall in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Queensland has a large share of Aircraft Maintenance Engineers.
  • They work in many industries. Some of the main industries are: Manufacturing; Transport, Postal and Warehousing; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Almost all work full-time. Full-time workers, on average, work 39.4 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,641 per week (very high compared to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 44 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • More than 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200512900
200610700
200713500
200813400
200916000
201015400
201113000
201211300
201310700
201410600
20159800
20208900

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsAircraft Maintenance EngineersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings16411230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryAircraft Maintenance EngineersAll Jobs Average
Full-time99.868.4
Part-time0.231.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)39.440

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing48.3
Transport, Postal and Warehousing40.4
Public Administration and Safety8.7
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services2.6

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateAircraft Maintenance EngineersAll Jobs Average
NSW24.831.8
VIC24.625.5
QLD38.419.8
SA3.16.8
WA3.311.2
TAS0.22
NT3.31.1
ACT2.11.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketAircraft Maintenance EngineersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-242.8-9.99.9
25-3427.8-23.423.4
35-4420.9-21.721.7
45-5421.9-21.121.1
55-5916-8.78.7
60-647.5-5.95.9
65 and Over3-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryAircraft Maintenance EngineersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males98.3Males53.6
Females1.7Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationAircraft Maintenance EngineersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate12.3-8.68.6
Bachelor degree0-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma21.7-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV61.3-18.918.9
Year 120-18.718.7
Years 11 & 104.7-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

A Certificate III/IV is usually needed to work in this job and three in five workers have this qualification. Training is most commonly through an apprenticeship which combines on-the-job training with the qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Aircraft Maintenance Engineers who are reliable, work well in a team and have a strong work ethic.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Mechanical

    94% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  2. English Language

    75% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Engineering and Technology

    68% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  4. Customer and Personal Service

    66% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  5. Mathematics

    64% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    92% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Documenting/Recording Information

    91% Important

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

  3. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    90% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  4. Checking Compliance with Standards

    89% Important

    Deciding whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

  5. Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment

    88% Important

    Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing mechanical machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment.

Occupational Information Network Avionics Technicians Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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