Panelbeaters repair damage to metal, fibreglass and plastic body work on vehicles, and form replacement vehicle panels.

A Certificate III/IV is usually needed to work in this job and three quarters of workers have this qualification. Training is most commonly through an apprenticeship which combines on-the-job training with the qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • removing damaged panels and parts, and removing upholstery and accessories to gain access
  • removing dents by hammering panels
  • straightening damaged vehicles and parts using mechanical and hydraulic equipment
  • replacing badly damaged sections with new or second-hand panels
  • filling depressions with plastic filler, and filing, grinding and sanding repaired surfaces
  • cutting and joining replacement sections using welding equipment
  • fitting repaired or replacement panels on vehicles and refitting body hardware such as door locks and trims
  • may assist vehicle body builders in constructing and restoring custom-designed, vintage and other specialty vehicles
  • may spray-paint vehicles

Job Titles

  • Panelbeater, or Collision Repairer

    Fast Facts

    • Avg. Weekly Pay

      $869 Before Tax
    • Future Growth

      decline
    • Skill Level

      Certificate III or IV
    • Employment Size

      16100
    • Unemployment

      average
    • Male Share

      94.2%
    • Female Share

      5.8%
    • Full-Time Share

      90.6%

    Find Vacancies

    This is a medium sized occupation employing 16,100 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has stayed about the same.
    A fall in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

    • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Queensland has a large share of Panelbeaters.
    • They nearly all work in Other Services.
    • Almost all work full-time. Full-time workers, on average, work 40.2 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
    • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $869 per week (lower than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • The average age is 39 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
    • More than 9 in 10 workers are male.
    • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

    There have been shortages of Panel Beaters for a number of years. In 2016, employers in nearly all states and territories (except South Australia and regional Western Australia) found it hard to recruit Panel Beaters. To find out more, view the Department of Employment's latest skill shortage research opens in a new window.

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
    YearNumber of Workers
    200517100
    200617400
    200715400
    200816700
    200914500
    201015700
    201116200
    201213000
    201318900
    201416400
    201516100
    202015400

    Weekly Earnings

    Full-time Earnings

    All Jobs Average

    Weekly Earnings (before tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsPanelbeatersAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings8691230

    Hours

    Weekly Hours Worked

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
    CategoryPanelbeatersAll Jobs Average
    Full-time90.668.4
    Part-time9.431.6
    Average Weekly Hours (full-time)40.240

    Main Industries

    Top Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Other Services99
    Manufacturing0.8
    Transport, Postal and Warehousing0.2

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StatePanelbeatersAll Jobs Average
    NSW31.831.8
    VIC21.825.5
    QLD3119.8
    SA5.56.8
    WA6.111.2
    TAS1.72
    NT1.41.1
    ACT0.71.8

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketPanelbeatersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-197.3-5.45.4
    20-249.6-9.99.9
    25-3424.2-23.423.4
    35-4422-21.721.7
    45-5421.7-21.121.1
    55-596.3-8.78.7
    60-647-5.95.9
    65 and Over1.9-3.83.8

    Gender

    Male Share

    Female Share

    Gender (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    CategoryPanelbeatersCategoryAll Jobs Average
    Males94.2Males53.6
    Females5.8Females46.4

    Education Level

    Top Education Levels

    Highest Level of Education (% share)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    A Certificate III/IV is usually needed to work in this job and three quarters of workers have this qualification. Training is most commonly through an apprenticeship which combines on-the-job training with the qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

    If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
    The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

    It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

    Employers look for Panelbeaters who are reliable, trustworthy and responsible.

    Knowledge

    The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

    1. Mechanical

      70% Important

      Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

    2. English Language

      68% Important

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    3. Customer and Personal Service

      65% Important

      Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    4. Production and Processing

      64% Important

      Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

    5. Public Safety and Security

      60% Important

      Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

    Occupational Information Network Automotive Body and Related Repairers Opens in a new window
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Activities

    The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

    1. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

      73% Important

      Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

    2. Getting Information

      72% Important

      Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

    3. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

      71% Important

      Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

    4. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

      71% Important

      Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

    5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

      70% Important

      Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

    Occupational Information Network Automotive Body and Related Repairers Opens in a new window
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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