Electronics Trades Workers maintain, adjust and repair electronic equipment such as business machines, video and audio equipment, and electronic instruments and control systems, and transmit and receive radio messages.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • examining and testing machines, equipment, instruments and control systems to diagnose faults
  • adjusting, repairing, and replacing worn and defective parts and wiring, and maintaining machines, equipment and instruments
  • reassembling, test operating and adjusting equipment
  • advising users of correct operating procedures to prevent malfunctions
  • receiving messages by interpreting code and converting to plain language, and writing and typing messages for transmission
  • monitoring radio traffic, and transmitting and receiving voice messages
  • installing electronic instruments and control systems
  • applying knowledge of electrical, electronic, mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic principles in commissioning and maintaining control systems

Job Titles

  • Business Machine Mechanic
  • Communications Operator
  • Electronic Equipment Trades Worker
  • Electronic Instrument Trades Worker (General)
  • Electronic Instrument Trades Worker (Special Class)
  • Business Machine Mechanic (also called Office Equipment Technician or Office Machine Technician)

    Installs, maintains and repairs electronic business equipment such as multi-function devices, photocopiers, scanners, fax machines and cash registers.

    Specialisations: Photocopier Technician

  • Communications Operator

    Transmits and receives radio messages by use of morse code, voice and radio teletype.

    Specialisations: Communication Information Systems Sailor (Navy), Communications and Information Systems Controller (Air Force), Operator Specialist Communications (Army)

  • Electronic Equipment Trades Worker

    Installs, maintains and repairs electronic equipment and systems such as audio and visual reproduction equipment, home entertainment systems, computers and electronic security systems.

    Specialisations: Audiovisual Technician, Fire Alarm Technician, Home Theatre Technician, Security Technician, Video Technician

  • Electronic Instrument Trades Worker (General) (also called Instrument and Control Service Person)

    Installs, modifies, maintains and repairs electronic instruments and control systems. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Communication Electronic Technician (Air Force), Electronic Technician (Navy)

  • Electronic Instrument Trades Worker (Special Class) (also called Industrial Measurement and Control Technician)

    Installs, modifies, maintains and repairs complex electronic instruments and control systems which involve a combination of electrical, electronic, mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic principles. Registration or licensing may be required.

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,215 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    moderate
  • Skill Level

    Certificate III or IV
  • Employment Size

    30300
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    95.8%
  • Female Share

    4.2%
  • Full-Time Share

    82.5%

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This is a large occupation employing 30,300 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen.
Moderate growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 10,001 and 25,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Electronics Trades Workers work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Other Services; Construction; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
  • Full-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 39.6 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,215 per week (similar to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 40 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • More than 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200536700
200640300
200743700
200837400
200936600
201037500
201134500
201233400
201332400
201431800
201530300
202031300

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsElectronics Trades WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings12151230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryElectronics Trades WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-time82.568.4
Part-time17.531.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)39.640

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Other Services20.3
Construction19
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services12.9
Retail Trade10.3
Other Industries37.5

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateElectronics Trades WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW28.431.8
VIC23.125.5
QLD25.319.8
SA7.46.8
WA1211.2
TAS1.72
NT0.91.1
ACT1.21.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketElectronics Trades WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-192.4-5.45.4
20-249.3-9.99.9
25-3425.3-23.423.4
35-4422.8-21.721.7
45-5421.8-21.121.1
55-599-8.78.7
60-647.2-5.95.9
65 and Over2.2-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryElectronics Trades WorkersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males95.8Males53.6
Females4.2Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationElectronics Trades WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate10.4-8.68.6
Bachelor degree11.3-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma25.8-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV28.8-18.918.9
Year 127.5-18.718.7
Years 11 & 1016.3-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Electronics Trades Workers who are reliable, work well in a team and have a strong work ethic.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    84% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Computers and Electronics

    80% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  3. Engineering and Technology

    77% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  4. Telecommunications

    72% Important

    Transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.

  5. Mathematics

    64% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

    89% Important

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

  2. Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment

    87% Important

    Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing electronic machines, devices, and equipment.

  3. Getting Information

    86% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    83% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  5. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    78% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

Occupational Information Network Radio Operators Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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