Indigenous Health Workers assist with the coordination and provision of health care delivery to Indigenous communities.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is generally needed Registration or licensing may also be required.

Tasks

  • maintaining health records and statistics
  • acting as an advocate in the community they serve, and as a communicator and interpreter on behalf of clients and other health workers
  • providing clinical functions, such as case management and follow-up, independently or in consultation with other health care providers
  • providing health education to individual clients and staff in health facilities
  • providing cultural education to persons outside the cultural community and life skills education to the community they serve
  • providing counselling and referring clients to other health care providers where necessary

Job Titles

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker
  • Kaiawhina (Hauora) (Maori Health Assistant)
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker

    Liaises with patients, clients, visitors to hospitals and other medical facilities and staff at health clinics, and works as a team member to arrange, coordinate and provide health care delivery in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community health clinics. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Kaiawhina (Hauora) (Maori Health Assistant)

    Assists with health care delivery to patients and clients in accordance with Tikanga Maori (Maori culture and custom).

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    strong
  • Skill Level

    Associate Degree or Diploma
  • Employment Size

    1,000
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    29.0%
  • Female Share

    71.0%
  • Full-Time Share

    75.2%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 1000 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
Strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, The Northern Territory, Western Australia and Queensland have a large share of Indigenous Health Workers.
  • They work in many industries. Some of the main industries are: Health Care and Social Assistance; Public Administration and Safety; and No other main Industry.
  • Full-time work is common. Full-time workers, on average, work 35.1 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The workforce is fairly mature. The average age is 50 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 8 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 7 in 10 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20051300
20061400
20072500
2008900
20091700
2010600
2011700
2012500
20131300
20141500
20151000
20201100

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryIndigenous Health WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-time75.268.4
Part-time24.831.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)35.140.0

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Health Care and Social Assistance77.4
Public Administration and Safety22.6

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateIndigenous Health WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW15.431.8
VIC10.825.5
QLD26.019.8
SA7.06.8
WA18.011.2
TAS0.02.0
NT22.71.1
ACT0.01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketIndigenous Health WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.45.4
20-240.0-9.99.9
25-340.0-23.423.4
35-4423.1-21.721.7
45-5432.6-21.121.1
55-5944.3-8.78.7
60-640.0-5.95.9
65 and Over0.0-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryIndigenous Health WorkersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males29.0Males53.6
Females71.0Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is generally needed Registration or licensing may also be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Indigenous Health Care Workers who are caring, compassionate and empathetic and have good social skills.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Therapy and Counseling

    100% Important

    Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and career counselling and guidance.

  2. Psychology

    99% Important

    Human behaviour and performance; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioural and affective disorders.

  3. English Language

    90% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Customer and Personal Service

    89% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  5. Sociology and Anthropology

    80% Important

    Group behaviour and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.

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Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    95% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Assisting and Caring for Others

    94% Important

    Providing personal assistance, medical attention, or emotional support to people such as co-workers, customers, or patients.

  3. Building Good Relationships

    91% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

  4. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    91% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  5. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    90% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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