Travel Attendants provide services for the safety and comfort of passengers in aircraft, ships and railway sleeping cars.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Around half of workers have Year 12 as their highest level of education. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is usually needed.

Tasks

  • managing safety and emergency procedures and making public announcements
  • coordinating the sale of goods to passengers and completion of any customs and immigration documentation which may be required
  • conducting safety checks and demonstrations of safety equipment and procedures
  • assisting passengers in emergency drills, carrying out emergency procedures, assisting and directing passengers in emergencies
  • checking passengers' tickets and directing them to seats and cabins
  • tidying aircraft, ship and railway cabins, and receiving and stowing food, equipment and cabin baggage
  • operating galleys, preparing and heating food for passengers, and serving refreshments and meals
  • distributing reading material, pillows, blankets and other amenities for the comfort of passengers

Job Titles

  • Flight Attendant, or Cabin Crew
  • Other Travel Attendants
  • Flight Attendant, or Cabin Crew

    Provides services for the safety and comfort of aircraft passengers.

    Specialisations: Cabin Supervisor (Aircraft), Crew Attendant (Air Force)

  • Other Travel Attendants

    Includes Marine Steward

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,110 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    very strong
  • Skill Level

    Certificate III or IV
  • Employment Size

    12,000
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    24.2%
  • Female Share

    75.8%
  • Full-Time Share

    61.2%

Find Vacancies

This is a medium sized occupation employing 12,000 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has stayed about the same.
Very strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Travel Attendants work in most parts of Australia.
  • They nearly all work in Transport, Postal and Warehousing.
  • Full-time work is fairly common. Full-time workers, on average, work 31.8 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,110 per week (similar to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 35 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Around 8 in 10 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20059600
20068300
20078200
200811200
20098800
201011900
201111000
20129700
201310600
201411100
201512000
202014300

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsTravel AttendantsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings11101230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryTravel AttendantsAll Jobs Average
Full-time61.268.4
Part-time38.831.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)31.840.0

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Transport, Postal and Warehousing97.1
Administrative and Support Services1.5
Mining1.4

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateTravel AttendantsAll Jobs Average
NSW34.431.8
VIC19.125.5
QLD26.619.8
SA3.56.8
WA15.511.2
TAS0.02.0
NT0.61.1
ACT0.41.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketTravel AttendantsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-191.4-5.45.4
20-2418.1-9.99.9
25-3429.8-23.423.4
35-4412.6-21.721.7
45-5427.0-21.121.1
55-597.7-8.78.7
60-643.4-5.95.9
65 and Over0.0-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryTravel AttendantsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males24.2Males53.6
Females75.8Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed.
Around half of workers have Year 12 as their highest level of education. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is usually needed.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Travel Attendants who provide good customer service, are reliable and well presented.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    99% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Public Safety and Security

    89% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  3. Transportation

    83% Important

    Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

  4. English Language

    82% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Psychology

    79% Important

    Human behaviour and performance; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioural and affective disorders.

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Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    98% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

  2. Assisting and Caring for Others

    92% Important

    Providing personal assistance, medical attention, or emotional support to people such as co-workers, customers, or patients.

  3. Performing General Physical Activities

    85% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

  4. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    84% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  5. Handling and Moving Objects

    84% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

Occupational Information Network Flight Attendants Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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