Auctioneers, and Stock and Station Agents sell property at auction, and advise and represent farmers in business transactions such as buying and selling livestock, rural property, and goods and services.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is required to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes additional experience or on-the-job training is needed. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • appraising and listing property for auction
  • organising advertising, catalogues and other publicity for auctions
  • consulting vendors and setting reserve prices
  • describing property presented and the conditions of sale
  • asking for or setting opening bids and determining reserve prices
  • accepting bids from potential buyers and closing sales to the highest bidders
  • purchasing and selling livestock and rural property on behalf of clients
  • selling agricultural supplies, such as seed, grains, feed, sprays, dips, drenches and veterinary products, in accordance with statutory requirements
  • acting as an insurance agent for rural clients

Job Titles

  • Auctioneer
  • Stock and Station Agent
  • Auctioneer

    Conducts sales of real estate, goods and livestock by taking offers from buyers and accepting the highest purchase price. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Stock and Station Agent

    Provides advice to clients and acts on their behalf in relation to the sale and purchase of rural property, livestock, crops and agricultural products and services. Registration or licensing may be required.

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    strong
  • Skill Level

    Certificate III or IV
  • Employment Size

    2,100
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    86.5%
  • Female Share

    13.5%
  • Full-Time Share

    95.2%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 2100 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen.
Strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Victoria has a large share of Auctioneers, and Stock and Station Agents.
  • They work in many industries. Some of the main industries are: Wholesale Trade; Manufacturing; and Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services.
  • Almost all work full-time. Full-time workers, on average, work 44.3 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The average age is 44 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20054400
20065300
20074400
20082500
20093600
20104000
20112700
20123500
20131500
20142500
20152100
20202300

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryAuctioneers, and Stock and Station AgentsAll Jobs Average
Full-time95.268.4
Part-time4.831.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)44.340.0

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Wholesale Trade70.0
Manufacturing17.0
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services6.7
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing6.3

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateAuctioneers, and Stock and Station AgentsAll Jobs Average
NSW35.031.8
VIC52.725.5
QLD6.219.8
SA0.06.8
WA0.011.2
TAS2.82.0
NT3.31.1
ACT0.01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketAuctioneers, and Stock and Station AgentsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.45.4
20-245.3-9.99.9
25-3428.1-23.423.4
35-4417.0-21.721.7
45-5423.5-21.121.1
55-5913.2-8.78.7
60-644.8-5.95.9
65 and Over8.1-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryAuctioneers, and Stock and Station AgentsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males86.5Males53.6
Females13.5Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is required to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes additional experience or on-the-job training is needed. Registration or licensing may be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Auctioneers, and Stock and Station Agents who are well presented, can communicate with a diverse range of people and provide good customer service.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Administration and Management

    89% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    85% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. Economics and Accounting

    82% Important

    Economics and accounting, the financial markets, banking and checking and reporting of financial data.

  4. English Language

    80% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Clerical

    78% Important

    Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

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Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    90% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  2. Interacting With Computers

    89% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  3. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    88% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  4. Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others

    86% Important

    Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving conflicts, and negotiating with people.

  5. Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work

    84% Important

    Deciding on goals and putting together a detailed plan to get the work done.

Occupational Information Network Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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