Other Factory Process Workers includes a number of occupations such as Cement and Concrete Plant Workers, Chemical Plant Workers, Clay Processing Factory Workers, Fabric and Textile Factory Workers, Footwear Factory Workers, Glass Processing Workers, Hide and Skin Processing Workers and Recycling Workers.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job. Around one in three workers have Years 11 and 10 as their highest level of education.

Tasks

  • performs routine tasks in manufacturing cement and concrete products such as greasing and assembling concrete moulds, holding reinforcing steel in position during concrete pours, stripping moulds from dried concrete products, and finishing products
  • performs routine tasks in a chemical processing plant such as delivering materials to processing areas, dumping ingredients into hoppers, operating machines to heat, cool and agitate chemical solutions, filling and fastening covers on containers, and attaching labels and information on products
  • performs routine tasks in manufacturing clay and ceramic products such as loading clay into machines, stacking products on kiln cars, pallets and trolleys, and moving kiln cars and trolleys to and from kilns, dryers, sorting, storage and shipping areas
  • performs routine tasks in a fabric and textile factory such as cutting canvas, upholstery and curtain fabrics, delivering materials to machines, operating automatic machines using computerised patterns, pressing partially completed and finished garments, and inspecting and finishing completed garments
  • performs routine tasks in manufacturing footwear such as basic hand cutting of shoe components, delivering materials to machines, and inspecting and finishing completed footwear
  • performs routine tasks in manufacturing glassware such as setting up, adjusting and repairing automatic machines and equipment, and checking weight of glassware
  • performs routine tasks in tanning and finishing leather, hides and skins such as fleshing hides by cutting out pieces of flesh and fat, laying out hides and skins for classing and drying and arranging heaters to dry them, spraying dried hides with preservatives, and treating, pressing and securing hides and skins

Job Titles

  • Cement and Concrete Plant Worker
  • Chemical Plant Worker
  • Clay Processing Factory Worker
  • Fabric and Textile Factory Worker
  • Footwear Factory Worker
  • Glass Processing Worker
  • Hide and Skin Processing Worker
  • Recycling Worker
  • Other Factory Process Workers
  • Cement and Concrete Plant Worker

    Performs routine tasks in manufacturing cement and concrete products such as greasing and assembling concrete moulds, holding reinforcing steel in position during concrete pours, stripping moulds from dried concrete products, and finishing products.

  • Chemical Plant Worker

    Performs routine tasks in a chemical processing plant such as delivering materials to processing areas, dumping ingredients into hoppers, operating machines to heat, cool and agitate chemical solutions, filling and fastening covers on containers, and attaching labels and information on products.

    Specialisations: Gas Plant Worker, Munitions Factory Worker, Paint Factory Worker

  • Clay Processing Factory Worker (also called Clay Processing Factory Labourer)

    Performs routine tasks in manufacturing clay and ceramic products such as loading clay into machines, stacking products on kiln cars, pallets and trolleys, and moving kiln cars and trolleys to and from kilns, dryers, sorting, storage and shipping areas.

    Specialisations: Brick Handler, Kiln Labourer

  • Fabric and Textile Factory Worker

    Performs routine tasks in a fabric and textile factory such as cutting canvas, upholstery and curtain fabrics, delivering materials to machines, operating automatic machines using computerised patterns, pressing partially completed and finished garments, and inspecting and finishing completed garments.

  • Footwear Factory Worker

    Performs routine tasks in manufacturing footwear such as basic hand cutting of shoe components, delivering materials to machines, and inspecting and finishing completed footwear.

  • Glass Processing Worker

    Performs routine tasks in manufacturing glassware such as setting up, adjusting and repairing automatic machines and equipment, and checking weight of glassware.

    Specialisations: Glass Mould Cleaner

  • Hide and Skin Processing Worker

    Performs routine tasks in tanning and finishing leather, hides and skins such as fleshing hides by cutting out pieces of flesh and fat, laying out hides and skins for classing and drying and arranging heaters to dry them, spraying dried hides with preservatives, and treating, pressing and securing hides and skins.

    Specialisations: Fellmongery Worker, Hand Flesher, Tannery Worker

  • Recycling Worker (also called Recycling Sorter)

    Performs routine tasks in a recycling facility such as sorting, packing and storing plastics, glass, paper, metals and other recyclable materials which have been collected from household, commercial and industrial premises in preparation for use in creating new products.

  • Other Factory Process Workers

    Includes Sheltered Workshop Worker

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $999 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    stable
  • Skill Level

    High School or Certificate I
  • Employment Size

    11500
  • Unemployment

    above average
  • Male Share

    79.5%
  • Female Share

    20.5%
  • Full-Time Share

    67.8%

Find Vacancies

This is a small occupation employing 11,500 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen slightly.
Little change in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Victoria and South Australia have a large share of Other Factory Process Workers.
  • They mainly work in: Manufacturing; Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services; and Health Care and Social Assistance.
  • Full-time work is fairly common. Full-time workers, on average, work 38.6 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $999 per week (below the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 41 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Around 8 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was above average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200512500
200610400
200713400
20089600
200910200
201012400
201110700
20128100
20139400
20147500
201511500
202011100

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsOther Factory Process WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings9991230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther Factory Process WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-time67.868.4
Part-time32.231.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)38.640

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing46.5
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services16.8
Health Care and Social Assistance13.3
Wholesale Trade12.1
Other Industries11.3

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateOther Factory Process WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW14.531.8
VIC39.325.5
QLD21.819.8
SA12.16.8
WA9.211.2
TAS2.62
NT0.61.1
ACT01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketOther Factory Process WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-196-5.45.4
20-248.5-9.99.9
25-3423.7-23.423.4
35-4421.2-21.721.7
45-5421.6-21.121.1
55-599.8-8.78.7
60-647.1-5.95.9
65 and Over2.2-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther Factory Process WorkersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males79.5Males53.6
Females20.5Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.
Around one in three workers have Years 11 and 10 as their highest level of education.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Factory Process Workers who are reliable, can work independently and are hardworking.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Mechanical

    61% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  2. Mathematics

    55% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  3. Production and Processing

    55% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  4. English Language

    54% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Public Safety and Security

    52% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Handling and Moving Objects

    83% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  2. Performing General Physical Activities

    81% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

  3. Controlling Machines and Processes

    80% Important

    Operate machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

  4. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    74% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  5. Getting Information

    73% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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