Other Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers includes a range of occupations such as Hunter-Trappers and Pest Controllers.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job. Pest Controllers usually need a Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • hunts, traps and shoots animals for food, pelts, research and for pest control registration or licensing may be required
  • applies pest or weed management techniques to kill and control pests or weeds in domestic, commercial and industrial areas, roadsides, and private and public lands registration or licensing may be required

Job Titles

  • Hunter-Trapper, Hunter, or Shooter
  • Pest Controller
  • Other Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers
  • Hunter-Trapper, Hunter, or Shooter

    Hunts, traps and shoots animals for food, pelts, research and for pest control. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Pest Controller (also called Pest Control Operator or Pest Control Technician)

    Applies pest management techniques to control invertebrate and insect pests inside and outside domestic, commercial and industrial premises. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Fumigator, Termite Technician

  • Other Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers

    Includes Bush Regenerator, Indoor Plant Technician, Irrigationist, Kelp or Seagrass Gatherer, Seed Collector, Weed Controller

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $940 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    moderate
  • Skill Level

    High School or Certificate I
  • Employment Size

    10,100
  • Unemployment

    above average
  • Male Share

    93.2%
  • Female Share

    6.8%
  • Full-Time Share

    81.3%

Find Vacancies

This is a small occupation employing 10,100 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen slightly.
Moderate growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Other Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Administrative and Support Services; Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Full-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 39.8 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $940 per week (lower than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 40 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • More than 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was above average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20058100
20069800
200710000
20089300
20097900
201011800
201112200
201210600
201310100
201410600
201510100
202010600

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsOther Farm, Forestry and Garden WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings9401230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther Farm, Forestry and Garden WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-time81.368.4
Part-time18.731.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)39.840.0

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Administrative and Support Services55.6
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing18.1
Public Administration and Safety6.8
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services5.2
Other Industries14.3

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateOther Farm, Forestry and Garden WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW34.731.8
VIC23.125.5
QLD22.619.8
SA7.56.8
WA6.611.2
TAS3.42.0
NT0.71.1
ACT1.41.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketOther Farm, Forestry and Garden WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-192.3-5.45.4
20-2415.3-9.99.9
25-3415.0-23.423.4
35-4423.7-21.721.7
45-5423.2-21.121.1
55-596.2-8.78.7
60-648.3-5.95.9
65 and Over6.2-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther Farm, Forestry and Garden WorkersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males93.2Males53.6
Females6.8Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job. Pest Controllers usually need a Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience. Registration or licensing may be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Other Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers who are fit, reliable and can work independently when needed but also as part of a team.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    76% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Public Safety and Security

    62% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  3. English Language

    62% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Chemistry

    59% Important

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change. Danger signs and disposal methods.

  5. Biology

    59% Important

    Plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, how they rely on and work with each other and the environment.

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Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    86% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    86% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  3. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    84% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  4. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    83% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  5. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    81% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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