Caretakers maintain and clean residential buildings, schools, offices, holiday camps, caravan parks and associated grounds.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.

Tasks

  • filling out registration forms and providing tenants with copies of rules
  • collecting rent, and filling out and issuing receipts
  • cleaning common facilities, grounds and gardens, replacing light bulbs, checking fire hoses and extinguishers, and performing other cleaning and maintenance tasks
  • notifying management and owners of buildings of the need for major repairs
  • cautioning tenants regarding excessive noise, disorderly conduct and abuse of property
  • patrolling buildings to ensure security is maintained
  • purchasing cleaning supplies

Job Titles

  • Caretaker
  • Caretaker

    Specialisations: Janitor

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $957 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    stable
  • Skill Level

    High School or Certificate I
  • Employment Size

    5,600
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    83.3%
  • Female Share

    16.7%
  • Full-Time Share

    57.7%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 5600 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen slightly.
Little change in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, New South Wales has a large share of Caretakers.
  • They mainly work in: Education and Training; Accommodation and Food Services; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Part-time work is fairly common, but more than half work full-time. Full-time workers, on average, work 38.7 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $957 per week (below the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The workforce is fairly mature. The average age is 56 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 7 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 8 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20054600
20065900
20075500
20084300
20096900
20106300
20114800
20126000
20137300
20146000
20155600
20205400

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsCaretakersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings9571230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryCaretakersAll Jobs Average
Full-time57.768.4
Part-time42.331.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)38.740.0

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Education and Training29.6
Accommodation and Food Services20.2
Public Administration and Safety11.2
Construction9.8
Other Industries29.2

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateCaretakersAll Jobs Average
NSW49.831.8
VIC15.525.5
QLD14.419.8
SA4.56.8
WA10.711.2
TAS1.82.0
NT1.71.1
ACT1.61.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketCaretakersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.5-5.45.4
20-247.4-9.99.9
25-348.7-23.423.4
35-4411.5-21.721.7
45-5418.1-21.121.1
55-5919.6-8.78.7
60-6415.5-5.95.9
65 and Over18.7-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryCaretakersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males83.3Males53.6
Females16.7Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Caretakers who are caring, trustworthy and responsible.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    64% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. English Language

    60% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Public Safety and Security

    59% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  4. Administration and Management

    49% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  5. Mechanical

    45% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Occupational Information Network Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Performing General Physical Activities

    71% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

  2. Handling and Moving Objects

    69% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  3. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    64% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  4. Getting Information

    61% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    60% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Occupational Information Network Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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