Production Managers plan, organise, direct, control and coordinate the production activities of forestry, manufacturing and mining organisations including physical and human resources.

A skill level equal to a Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job. Around one in four workers have a Certificate III/IV instead of a university degree.

Tasks

  • determining, implementing and monitoring production strategies, policies and plans
  • planning details of production activities in terms of output quality and quantity, cost, time available and labour requirements
  • controlling the operation of production plant and quality procedures through planning of maintenance, designation of operating hours and supply of parts and tools
  • monitoring production output and costs, and adjusting processes and resources to minimise costs
  • informing other Managers about production matters
  • overseeing the acquisition and installation of new plant and equipment
  • directing research into production methods, and recommending and implementing initiatives
  • controlling the preparation of production records and reports
  • coordinating the implementation of occupational health and safety requirements
  • directing staff activities and monitoring their performance

Job Titles

  • Production Manager (Forestry)
  • Production Manager (Manufacturing)
  • Production Manager (Mining)
  • Production Manager (Forestry) (also called Forest Manager)

    Manages the production activities of a forestry operation.

    Specialisations: Harvest Manager (Forestry), Operations Manager (Forestry)

  • Production Manager (Manufacturing)

    Manages the manufacturing activities of an organisation.

    Specialisations: Operations Manager (Production), Plant Manager (Manufacturing) , Works Manager (Manufacturing)

  • Production Manager (Mining) (also called Mine Manager or Mine Superintendent)

    Manages the production activities of a mining operation.

    Specialisations: Quarry Manager

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,634 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    stable
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    55,500
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    82.2%
  • Female Share

    17.8%
  • Full-Time Share

    94.8%

Find Vacancies

This is a very large occupation employing 55,500 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen slightly.
Little change in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 10,001 and 25,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Production Managers work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Manufacturing; Mining; and Wholesale Trade.
  • Almost all work full-time. Full-time workers, on average, work 43.1 hours per week.
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are high at around $1,634 per week. Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 45 years (compared to 40 for all careers) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 1 in 6 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearEmployment Level
200547800
200651200
200742500
200856300
200954200
201057300
201154600
201257600
201356200
201453600
201555500
202056600

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Careers Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015 cat. no. 6333.0. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsProduction ManagersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings16341230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
CategoryProduction ManagersAll Jobs Average
Full-time96.469
Part-time3.630.8
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)44.540.2

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing58.7
Mining12.8
Wholesale Trade6.2
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services3.8
Other Industries18.5

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
StateProduction ManagersAll Jobs Average
NSW29.631.8
VIC28.825.5
QLD18.419.8
SA6.96.7
WA13.311.1
TAS1.62
NT1.01.1
ACT0.31.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
Age BracketProduction ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.45.4
20-242.1-9.99.9
25-3413.5-23.323.3
35-4432.4-21.621.6
45-5429.1-21.121.1
55-5912.4-8.68.6
60-646.4-5.95.9
65 and Over4.1-3.73.7

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
CategoryProduction ManagersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males86.9Males53.8
Females13.1Females46.1

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

Source: Based on ABS 2016 Survey of Education and Work (SEW).
Type of QualificationProduction ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate9.4-8.58.5
Bachelor degree18.5-17.817.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma12.1-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV25.9-18.818.8
Year 1215.8-18.618.6
Years 11 & 109.9-17.617.6
Below Year 108.5-8.08.0

A skill level equal to a Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job.
Around one in four workers have a Certificate III/IV instead of a university degree.
If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Production Managers who are reliable, organised and can communicate clearly. Employers also value leadership and planning skills.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Production and Processing

    88% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  2. Mechanical

    77% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  3. Administration and Management

    73% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  4. Personnel and Human Resources

    64% Important

    Recruiting and training people. Managing pay and other entitlements like sick and holiday leave. Negotiating pay and conditions.

  5. Engineering and Technology

    61% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

Occupational Information Network First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Production and Operating Workers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    88% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  2. Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings

    86% Important

    Checking objects, actions, or events, keeping an eye out for problems.

  3. Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work

    85% Important

    Deciding on goals and putting together a detailed plan to get the work done.

  4. Getting Information

    83% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  5. Scheduling Work and Activities

    83% Important

    Working out the timing of events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

Occupational Information Network First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Production and Operating Workers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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