Archivists, Curators and Records Managers develop, maintain, implement and deliver systems for keeping, updating, accessing and preserving records, files, information, historical documents and artefacts.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job. The majority of workers have a university degree.

Tasks

  • evaluating and preserving records for administrative, historical, legal, evidential and other purposes
  • preparing record-keeping systems, indexes, guides and procedures for archival research and for the retention and destruction of records
  • identifying and classifying specimens and objects, and arranging restoration work
  • examining items and arranging examinations to determine condition and authenticity
  • designing and revising medical record forms
  • managing organisations' central records systems
  • analysing the record-keeping needs of organisations, and translating these needs into record management systems
  • maintaining computerised and other record management systems and record forms, and advising on their usage
  • controlling access to confidential information, and recommending codes of practice and procedures for accessing records
  • developing record cataloguing, coding and classification systems, and monitoring their use

Job Titles

  • Archivist
  • Gallery or Museum Curator
  • Health Information Manager
  • Records Manager
  • Archivist

    Analyses and documents records, and plans and organises systems and procedures for the safekeeping of records and historically valuable documents.

    Specialisations: Film Archivist, Legal Archivist, Manuscripts Archivist, Parliamentary Archivist

  • Gallery or Museum Curator

    Plans and organises a gallery or museum collection by drafting collection policies and arranging acquisitions of pieces.

  • Health Information Manager

    Plans, develops, implements and manages health information services, such as patient information systems, and clinical and administrative data, to meet the medical, legal, ethical and administrative requirements of health care delivery.

    Specialisations: Clinical Trial Data Manager, Health Data Administrator

  • Records Manager

    Designs, implements and administers record systems and related information services, to support efficient access, movement, updating, storage, retention and disposal of files and other organisational records.

    Specialisations: Freedom of Information Officer

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,595 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    very strong
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    6200
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    39.6%
  • Female Share

    60.4%
  • Full-Time Share

    76.6%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 6200 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen.
Very strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Archivists, Curators and Records Managers work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Public Administration and Safety; Arts and Recreation Services; and Health Care and Social Assistance.
  • Full-time work is common. Full-time workers, on average, work 32.9 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,595 per week (higher than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 44 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Around 6 in 10 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20054300
20064400
20076100
20086500
20096700
20108600
20116200
20126600
20138600
20148100
20156200
20207200

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsArchivists, Curators and Records ManagersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings15951230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryArchivists, Curators and Records ManagersAll Jobs Average
Full-time76.668.4
Part-time23.431.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)32.940

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Public Administration and Safety33.4
Arts and Recreation Services25.7
Health Care and Social Assistance20
Education and Training5.4
Other Industries15.5

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateArchivists, Curators and Records ManagersAll Jobs Average
NSW30.131.8
VIC25.225.5
QLD17.419.8
SA8.56.8
WA6.811.2
TAS0.92
NT11.1
ACT10.11.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketArchivists, Curators and Records ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-2413.6-9.99.9
25-3414.4-23.423.4
35-4429.7-21.721.7
45-5419.9-21.121.1
55-5915.5-8.78.7
60-646.9-5.95.9
65 and Over0-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryArchivists, Curators and Records ManagersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males39.6Males53.6
Females60.4Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job. The majority of workers have a university degree.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

  • myfuture (login required) and the Good Education Group provide information about courses at all levels.
  • My Skills is the national directory of Vocational Education and Training (VET) and provides information about nationally recognised training and training providers that deliver it.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Archivists, Curators and Records Managers who have strong attention to detail, can communicate clearly with a wide variety of people and who can work well in a team.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. English Language

    88% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  2. History and Archeology

    84% Important

    Events of the past, their causes, how we learn about them, and how they influence the way we live today.

  3. Customer and Personal Service

    71% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  4. Computers and Electronics

    70% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  5. Administration and Management

    67% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

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Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Documenting/Recording Information

    92% Important

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

  2. Getting Information

    91% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Interacting With Computers

    90% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  4. Communicating with Persons Outside Organization

    86% Important

    Communicating with customers, the public, government, and others in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

  5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    85% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Occupational Information Network Administrative Services Managers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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