Land Economists and Valuers provide advice on the administration and use of land and property, and assess the value of land, property and other items such as commercial equipment and objects of art.

A skill level equal to Bachelor Degree or higher is needed to work in this job, although only half of workers have a university degree. Sometimes relevant experience or on-the-job training is also needed. Registration or licensing may be required, depending on which state or territory you live in.

Tasks

  • providing advice on land and property financing and valuation matters
  • researching and advising on the administration and use of land and property
  • developing and implementing sales and leasing proposals for commercial land and property
  • providing asset management services for the administration and use of land and property
  • analysing land and property investments
  • managing land and property portfolios and commercial property developments
  • calculating values by considering market demand, condition of items, future trends and other factors
  • examining property, selecting methods of valuation, and submitting written assessments
  • giving evidence in legal proceedings, mediating on valuation matters and providing rental determinations for arbitration purposes

Job Titles

  • Land or Property Economist
  • Valuer
  • Land or Property Economist

    Provides advice on the administration and use of land and property.

    Specialisations: Asset Manager (Land and Property)

  • Valuer

    Assesses the value of land, property, commercial equipment, merchandise, personal effects, household goods and objects of art. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Plant and Machinery Valuer, Property Valuer, Real Estate Valuer

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    moderate
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    10900
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    81.3%
  • Female Share

    18.7%
  • Full-Time Share

    77.8%

Find Vacancies

This is a small occupation employing 10,900 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
Moderate growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Land Economists and Valuers work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services; Financial and Insurance Services; and Wholesale Trade.
  • Full-time work is common. Full-time workers, on average, work 43.9 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The average age is 43 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 8 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200511700
200613000
200715200
200812300
20099400
20107400
201110100
201212200
201310200
201410400
201510900
202011500

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryLand Economists and ValuersAll Jobs Average
Full-time77.868.4
Part-time22.231.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)43.940

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services62.5
Financial and Insurance Services9.2
Wholesale Trade7.6
Construction6.7
Other Industries14

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateLand Economists and ValuersAll Jobs Average
NSW32.331.8
VIC30.325.5
QLD23.919.8
SA46.8
WA6.211.2
TAS1.42
NT0.51.1
ACT1.31.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketLand Economists and ValuersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-244.6-9.99.9
25-3417.8-23.423.4
35-4432-21.721.7
45-5420.4-21.121.1
55-599.7-8.78.7
60-646.8-5.95.9
65 and Over8.7-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryLand Economists and ValuersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males81.3Males53.6
Females18.7Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A skill level equal to Bachelor Degree or higher is needed to work in this job, although only half of workers have a university degree. Sometimes relevant experience or on-the-job training is also needed. Registration or licensing may be required, depending on which state or territory you live in.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

  • myfuture (login required) and the Good Education Group provide information about courses at all levels.
  • My Skills is the national directory of Vocational Education and Training (VET) and provides information about nationally recognised training and training providers that deliver it.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Land Economists and Valuers who have strong attention to detail, provide good customer service and have strong interpersonal skills.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    80% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Mathematics

    80% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  3. Law and Government

    79% Important

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

  4. Clerical

    77% Important

    Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

  5. Computers and Electronics

    73% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    94% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Analyzing Data or Information

    89% Important

    Looking at, working with, and understanding data or information.

  3. Interacting With Computers

    89% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  4. Judging Things, Services, or People

    89% Important

    Working out the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

  5. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    86% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

Occupational Information Network Assessors Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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