Urban and Regional Planners develop and implement plans and policies for the controlled use of urban and rural land, and advise on economic, environmental and social factors affecting land use.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is required to work in this job.

Tasks

  • compiling and analysing data on economic, legal, political, cultural, demographic, sociological, physical and environmental factors affecting land use
  • conferring with government authorities, communities, Architects, social scientists, Legal Professionals, and planning, development and environmental specialists
  • devising and recommending use and development of land, and presenting narrative and graphic plans, programs and designs to groups and individuals
  • advising governments and organisations on urban and regional planning and resource planning
  • reviewing and evaluating environmental impact reports
  • staying up-to-date with changes in building and zoning codes, regulations and other legal issues
  • may serve as mediators in disputes over planning proposals and projects
  • may speak at public meetings and appear before government to explain planning proposals

Job Titles

  • Urban and Regional Planner
  • Urban and Regional Planner

    Specialisations: Land Planner, Town Planner, Traffic and Transport Planner

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,404 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    moderate
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    8,900
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    48.8%
  • Female Share

    51.2%
  • Full-Time Share

    89.7%

Find Vacancies

This is a small occupation employing 8900 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen slightly.
Moderate growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, New South Wales has a large share of Urban and Regional Planners.
  • They mainly work in: Public Administration and Safety; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services.
  • Full-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 35.9 hours per week.
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are high at around $1,404 per week. Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The workforce is fairly young. The average age is 34 years (compared to 40 for all careers).
  • Around 1 in 2 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearEmployment Level
200511100
200610500
200711200
200811100
200911400
201010500
20119600
201213400
201311100
201411100
20158900
20209300

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Careers Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015 cat. no. 6333.0. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsUrban and Regional PlannersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings14041230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
CategoryUrban and Regional PlannersAll Jobs Average
Full-time79.469
Part-time20.630.8
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)35.640.2

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Public Administration and Safety59.6
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services23.8
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services5.8
Construction3.3
Other Industries7.5

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
StateUrban and Regional PlannersAll Jobs Average
NSW43.531.8
VIC27.925.5
QLD13.419.8
SA7.26.7
WA3.711.1
TAS1.82
NT0.81.1
ACT1.61.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
Age BracketUrban and Regional PlannersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.45.4
20-248.6-9.99.9
25-3444.4-23.323.3
35-4419.7-21.621.6
45-5414.7-21.121.1
55-594.6-8.68.6
60-647.9-5.95.9
65 and Over0.0-3.73.7

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
CategoryUrban and Regional PlannersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males58.7Males53.8
Females41.3Females46.1

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

Source: Based on ABS 2016 Survey of Education and Work (SEW).
Type of QualificationUrban and Regional PlannersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate33.6-8.58.5
Bachelor degree66.4-17.817.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma0.0-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV0.0-18.818.8
Year 120.0-18.618.6
Years 11 & 100.0-17.617.6
Below Year 100.0-8.08.0

A Bachelor Degree or higher is required to work in this job.
If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Urban and Regional Planners who can communicate clearly, work well in a team and have strong interpersonal skills.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. English Language

    86% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  2. Law and Government

    83% Important

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

  3. Administration and Management

    78% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  4. Geography

    77% Important

    Describing land, sea, and air, including their physical characteristics, locations, how they work together, and the location of plant, animal, and human life.

  5. Communications and Media

    74% Important

    Media production, communication, and dissemination. Includes written, spoken, and visual media.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Developing Objectives and Strategies

    93% Important

    Deciding on goals and the figuring out what you need to do to achieve them.

  2. Communicating with Persons Outside Organization

    93% Important

    Communicating with customers, the public, government, and others in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

  3. Getting Information

    92% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    91% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

  5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    90% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Occupational Information Network Urban and Regional Planners Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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