Medical Imaging Professionals operate X-ray and other radiation producing and imaging equipment for diagnostic, monitoring and treatment purposes under the direction of Radiologists and other Medical Practitioners.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is required and for some roles a 1 year post graduation development year is necessary. Nearly all workers have a university degree. Sometimes relevant experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to the qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • receiving referrals from Medical Practitioners to perform medical imaging and radiation treatment of patients
  • determining the appropriate equipment to use, such as X-ray equipment, radiation scanners, fluoroscopes, ultrasound equipment, nuclear instrumentation, angiography equipment and computed tomography (CT) equipment, and selecting the appropriate equipment settings to provide the diagnostic information requested by Medical Practitioners
  • calculating details of procedures such as length and intensity of exposure to radiation, size and strength of dosage of isotopes, and settings of recording equipment
  • explaining procedures to patients and answering patients' inquiries about processes
  • ensuring patients' welfare during procedures
  • positioning patients, screens and equipment preparatory to procedures
  • viewing the screen and deciding if images are satisfactory for diagnostic purposes, and selecting images to show Medical Practitioners
  • conveying findings of procedures to Medical Practitioners

Job Titles

  • Medical Diagnostic Radiographer, or Medical Imaging Technologist
  • Medical Radiation Therapist
  • Nuclear Medicine Technologist
  • Sonographer or Ultrasonographer
  • Medical Diagnostic Radiographer, or Medical Imaging Technologist

    Operates X-ray and other medical imaging equipment to produce images for medical diagnostic purposes in conjunction with Diagnostic and Interventional Radiologists or other Medical Practitioners. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Medical Radiation Therapist

    Operates high energy X-ray and other radiation and electron generating and monitoring equipment to administer radiation treatment for medical purposes in conjunction with Radiation Oncologists or other specialist Medical Practitioners. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Magnetic Resonance Technologist

  • Nuclear Medicine Technologist

    Performs or assists in performing diagnostic examinations using radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals, and administers radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic purposes under the direction of specialist Medical Practitioners. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Sonographer or Ultrasonographer

    Operates ultrasound equipment to acquire, interpret and selectively record anatomical images, physical data and real-time physiological information for medical diagnostic purposes in conjunction with Medical Practitioners.

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,720 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    very strong
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    19800
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    28.4%
  • Female Share

    71.6%
  • Full-Time Share

    69.9%

Find Vacancies

This is a medium sized occupation employing 19,800 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
Very strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 10,001 and 25,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Medical Imaging Professionals work in most parts of Australia.
  • They nearly all work in Health Care and Social Assistance.
  • Full-time work is fairly common. Full-time workers, on average, work 37.3 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,720 per week (very high compared to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 36 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Around 7 in 10 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

There have been shortages of Sonographers for a number of years. In 2016, employers in most locations found it hard to fill vacancies for Sonographers. To find out more, view the Department of Employment's latest skill shortage research opens in a new window.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200512100
200610800
200712900
200811800
200911800
201014400
201118600
201213100
201315900
201418700
201519800
202025600

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsMedical Imaging ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings17201230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryMedical Imaging ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
Full-time69.968.4
Part-time30.131.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)37.340

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Health Care and Social Assistance99.1
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services0.8
Public Administration and Safety0.2

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateMedical Imaging ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
NSW31.731.8
VIC20.825.5
QLD22.719.8
SA8.26.8
WA10.211.2
TAS3.82
NT0.51.1
ACT2.21.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketMedical Imaging ProfessionalsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-2410.3-9.99.9
25-3436.6-23.423.4
35-4417.4-21.721.7
45-5424.3-21.121.1
55-593.1-8.78.7
60-648.3-5.95.9
65 and Over0-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryMedical Imaging ProfessionalsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males28.4Males53.6
Females71.6Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is required and for some roles a 1 year post graduation development year is necessary. Nearly all workers have a university degree. Sometimes relevant experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to the qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Medical Imaging Professionals who are caring and empathetic and can work well in a team, with the ability to communicate with a diverse range of people.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    92% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Medicine and Dentistry

    78% Important

    Diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.

  3. English Language

    76% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Computers and Electronics

    74% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  5. Physics

    70% Important

    Physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Assisting and Caring for Others

    97% Important

    Providing personal assistance, medical attention, or emotional support to people such as co-workers, customers, or patients.

  2. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    93% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

  3. Getting Information

    88% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

    86% Important

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

  5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    84% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Occupational Information Network Radiation Therapists Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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