Psychologists investigate, assess and provide treatment and counselling to foster optimal personal, social, educational and occupational adjustment and development.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is required. Sometimes relevant experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to the qualification. Registration or licensing may also required.

Tasks

  • collecting data about clients and assessing their cognitive, behavioural and emotional disorders
  • administering and interpreting diagnostic tests and formulating plans for treatment
  • developing, administering and evaluating individual and group treatment programs
  • consulting with other professionals on details of cases and treatment plans
  • conducting research studies of motivation in learning, group performance and individual differences in mental abilities and educational performance
  • collecting data and analysing characteristics of students and recommending educational programs
  • formulating achievement, diagnostic and predictive tests for use by teachers in planning methods and content of instruction
  • developing interview techniques, psychological tests and other aids in workplace selection, placement, appraisal and promotion
  • conducting surveys and research studies on job design, work groups, morale, motivation, supervision and management
  • performing job analyses and establishing job requirements by observing and interviewing employees and managers

Job Titles

  • Clinical Psychologist
  • Educational Psychologist
  • Organisational, Industrial or Occupational Psychologist
  • Psychotherapist
  • Other Psychologists
  • Clinical Psychologist

    Consults with individuals and groups, assesses psychological disorders and administers programs of treatment. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Forensic Psychologist, Health Psychologist, Neuropsychologist

  • Educational Psychologist

    Investigates learning and teaching, and develops psychological techniques to foster the development and skills of individuals and groups in educational settings. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Organisational, Industrial or Occupational Psychologist

    Applies psychological principles and techniques to study occupational behaviour, working conditions and organisational structure, and solve problems of work performance and organisational design. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Psychotherapist

    Provides diagnosis and treatment of mental and emotional disorders using psychotherapeutic methods such as behavioural therapy, biofeedback, relaxation therapy and other techniques.

    Specialisations: Art Psychotherapist or Therapist

  • Other Psychologists

    Includes Counselling Psychologist, Sport Psychologist. Registration or licensing is required.

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,934 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    very strong
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    28,800
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    20.9%
  • Female Share

    79.1%
  • Full-Time Share

    62.9%

Find Vacancies

This is a large occupation employing 28,800 workers. The number of workers has grown very strongly over the past 5 years.
Over the next 5 years (to May 2022) the number of workers is expected to grow very strongly to 33,700. Around 24,000 job openings are likely over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Psychologists work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Health Care and Social Assistance; Public Administration and Safety; and Education and Training.
  • Full-time work is fairly common. Full-time workers, on average, work 36.2 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,934 per week (very high compared to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 41 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Around 8 in 10 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200713800
200820000
200923500
201019900
201121700
201221400
201322000
201422500
201522500
201629200
201728800
202233700

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsPsychologistsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings19341230

Hours

Full-Time and Part-Time Status (% Share) and Average Weekly Hours (Full-Time)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryPsychologistsAll Jobs Average
Full-time62.968.4
Part-time37.131.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)36.240

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Health Care and Social Assistance73.4
Public Administration and Safety12.6
Education and Training8
Administrative and Support Services2.6
Other Industries3.4

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StatePsychologistsAll Jobs Average
NSW31.431.8
VIC32.825.5
QLD15.619.8
SA5.16.8
WA8.411.2
TAS2.52
NT0.41.1
ACT3.81.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketPsychologistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-242.9-9.99.9
25-3430.5-23.423.4
35-4426.1-21.721.7
45-5420.9-21.121.1
55-594.2-8.78.7
60-646.1-5.95.9
65 and Over9.3-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryPsychologistsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males20.9Males53.6
Females79.1Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationPsychologistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate78.5-8.68.6
Bachelor degree21.5-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma0-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV0-18.918.9
Year 120-18.718.7
Years 11 & 100-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

A Bachelor Degree or higher is required. Sometimes relevant experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to the qualification. Registration or licensing may also required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Psychologists who are caring, compassionate, empathetic and work well in a team.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Psychology

    100% Important

    Human behaviour and performance; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioural and affective disorders.

  2. Therapy and Counseling

    98% Important

    Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and career counselling and guidance.

  3. English Language

    90% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Customer and Personal Service

    79% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  5. Law and Government

    63% Important

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 19-3031.02 - Clinical Psychologists.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Assisting and Caring for Others

    99% Important

    Providing personal assistance, medical attention, or emotional support to people such as co-workers, customers, or patients.

  2. Getting Information

    96% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Judging Things, Services, or People

    94% Important

    Working out the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

  4. Building Good Relationships

    90% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

  5. Interpreting Information for Others

    90% Important

    Helping people to understand and use information.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 19-3031.02 - Clinical Psychologists.

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