Motor Mechanics repair, maintain and test motor vehicle and other internal combustion engines and related mechanical components.

A Certificate III/IV is usually needed to work in this job and most Motor Mechanics have this qualification. Training is most commonly through an apprenticeship which combines on-the-job training with the qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • detecting and diagnosing faults in engines and parts
  • dismantling and removing engine assemblies, transmissions, steering mechanisms and other components, and checking parts
  • repairing and replacing worn and defective parts and reassembling mechanical components, and referring to service manuals as needed
  • performing scheduled maintenance services, such as oil changes, lubrications and engine tune-ups, to achieve smoother running of vehicles and ensure compliance with pollution regulations
  • reassembling engines and parts after being repaired
  • testing and adjusting mechanical parts after being repaired for proper performance
  • diagnosing and testing parts with the assistance of computers
  • may inspect vehicles and issue roadworthiness certificates or detail work required to achieve roadworthiness

Job Titles

  • Motor Mechanic (General)
  • Diesel Motor Mechanic
  • Motorcycle Mechanic
  • Small Engine Mechanic
  • Motor Mechanic (General) (also called Automotive Light Mechanic)

    Maintains, tests and repairs petrol engines and the mechanical parts of lightweight motor vehicles such as transmissions, suspension, steering and brakes. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Automatic Transmission Mechanic, Automotive Airconditioning Mechanic, Brake Mechanic, Ground Support Equipment Fitter (Air Force), Roadside Mechanic, Vehicle Mechanic (Army)

  • Diesel Motor Mechanic

    Maintains, tests and repairs diesel motors and the mechanical parts of trucks, buses and other heavy vehicles such as transmissions, suspension, steering and brakes. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Automotive Heavy Mechanic

  • Motorcycle Mechanic

    Maintains, tests and repairs the mechanical parts of motorcycles. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Small Engine Mechanic

    Maintains, tests and repairs engines of chainsaws, lawn mowers, garden tractors and other equipment with small engines. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Chainsaw Mechanic, Lawnmower Mechanic, Outboard Motor Mechanic

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,000 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    stable
  • Skill Level

    Certificate III or IV
  • Employment Size

    100700
  • Unemployment

    below average
  • Male Share

    99.7%
  • Female Share

    0.3%
  • Full-Time Share

    94.8%

Find Vacancies

This is a very large occupation employing 100,700 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
Little change in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 10,001 and 25,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Motor Mechanics work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Other Services; Retail Trade; and Transport, Postal and Warehousing.
  • Almost all work full-time. Full-time workers, on average, work 41.6 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,000 per week (below the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The workforce is fairly young. The average age is 34 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Around 2 in 10 workers are young (aged 15 to 25 years).
  • More than 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was below average.

In 2016, employers in some locations found it hard to fill vacancies for Motor Mechanics. To find out more, view the Department of Employment's latest skill shortage research opens in a new window.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200592200
200692300
2007102700
2008103300
200983200
201092000
201190600
201283900
201393100
2014105700
2015100700
202098100

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsMotor MechanicsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings10001230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryMotor MechanicsAll Jobs Average
Full-time94.868.4
Part-time5.231.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)41.640

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Other Services59.7
Retail Trade15.5
Transport, Postal and Warehousing5.1
Manufacturing5.1
Other Industries14.6

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateMotor MechanicsAll Jobs Average
NSW29.531.8
VIC21.525.5
QLD22.519.8
SA8.56.8
WA12.211.2
TAS2.52
NT2.41.1
ACT0.91.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketMotor MechanicsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-198.1-5.45.4
20-2413.9-9.99.9
25-3429.4-23.423.4
35-4419.7-21.721.7
45-5415.9-21.121.1
55-596.2-8.78.7
60-644.1-5.95.9
65 and Over2.7-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryMotor MechanicsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males99.7Males53.6
Females0.3Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationMotor MechanicsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0-8.68.6
Bachelor degree2.1-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma5.7-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV72.5-18.918.9
Year 127-18.718.7
Years 11 & 1012.7-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

A Certificate III/IV is usually needed to work in this job and most Motor Mechanics have this qualification. Training is most commonly through an apprenticeship which combines on-the-job training with the qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Motor Mechanics who are hardworking with a good work ethic, reliable and provide good customer service.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Mechanical

    92% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  2. Engineering and Technology

    72% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  3. Computers and Electronics

    71% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  4. Customer and Personal Service

    70% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  5. English Language

    63% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Occupational Information Network Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    89% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    88% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  3. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    87% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  4. Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment

    85% Important

    Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing mechanical machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment.

  5. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

    84% Important

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

Occupational Information Network Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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