Floor Finishers measure, cut, install and repair soft and resilient floor coverings.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Most workers have Year 11 and 10 as their highest educational attainment. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Some additional tickets may also be required.

Tasks

  • measuring areas to be covered and consulting plans to estimate quantities of floor covering materials required
  • preparing surfaces for covering and removing baseboard trims
  • measuring, cutting and fixing underlay materials
  • laying coverings, such as carpets, linoleum, parquetry blocks, cork tiles and other resilient flooring materials, over floors, matching patterns, cutting shapes around fixtures and trimming edges
  • securing floor coverings and fitting edge trims in doorways
  • sanding, staining and applying finishing coatings to timber floors
  • may install wall, ceiling, counter and bench coverings

Job Titles

  • Floor Finisher
  • Floor Finisher

    Specialisations: Carpet Layer, Parquetry Layer

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $855 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    stable
  • Skill Level

    Certificate III or IV
  • Employment Size

    12700
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    96.8%
  • Female Share

    3.2%
  • Full-Time Share

    85.9%

Find Vacancies

This is a medium sized occupation employing 12,700 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
Little change in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Floor Finishers work in most parts of Australia.
  • They nearly all work in Construction.
  • Full-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 41.8 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $855 per week (lower than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 42 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • More than 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200511200
200612100
200710000
200814100
200912100
20109800
201110600
201211800
20139100
20147800
201512700
202012700

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsFloor FinishersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings8551230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryFloor FinishersAll Jobs Average
Full-time85.968.4
Part-time14.131.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)41.840

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Construction91.3
Retail Trade3
Administrative and Support Services2.3
Manufacturing1.5
Other Industries1.9

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateFloor FinishersAll Jobs Average
NSW21.231.8
VIC32.125.5
QLD24.919.8
SA3.96.8
WA10.711.2
TAS4.52
NT0.81.1
ACT1.81.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketFloor FinishersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-192.2-5.45.4
20-2417.1-9.99.9
25-3423.9-23.423.4
35-4414.7-21.721.7
45-5420.3-21.121.1
55-596.4-8.78.7
60-6411.5-5.95.9
65 and Over3.9-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryFloor FinishersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males96.8Males53.6
Females3.2Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Most workers have Year 11 and 10 as their highest educational attainment. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Some additional tickets may also be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Floor Finishers who are reliable, work well in a team and who are hardworking.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    73% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Mathematics

    68% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  3. Administration and Management

    68% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  4. English Language

    66% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Building and Construction

    66% Important

    Materials, methods, and the tools used to construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Performing General Physical Activities

    92% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

  2. Handling and Moving Objects

    89% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  3. Getting Information

    83% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    78% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  5. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    74% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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