Survey Interviewers interview people and record their responses to survey and market research questions on a range of topics.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary.

Tasks

  • contacting people face-to-face and via the telephone to conduct surveys
  • recording answers to survey questions manually and electronically
  • recording the distribution of questionnaires
  • collecting questionnaires and returning them to supervisors
  • scanning questionnaires to ensure that important questions have been answered
  • may interview people at random in crowds and on the street
  • may provide self-completion questionnaires
  • may encode responses and check their consistency
  • may work in a call centre

Job Titles

  • Survey Interviewer
  • Survey Interviewer

    Specialisations: Market Research Interviewer

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    decline
  • Skill Level

    High School or Certificate I
  • Employment Size

    2600
  • Unemployment

    above average
  • Male Share

    59.0%
  • Female Share

    41.0%
  • Full-Time Share

    22.5%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 2600 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen.
A fall in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Survey Interviewers work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; Public Administration and Safety; and Transport, Postal and Warehousing.
  • Part-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 41.0 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The workforce is fairly young. The average age is 28 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Around 4 in 10 workers are young (aged 15 to 25 years) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 6 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was above average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20053000
20063200
20076000
20085100
20092900
20104200
20115600
20125700
20134000
20142300
20152600
20202300

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategorySurvey InterviewersAll Jobs Average
Full-time22.568.4
Part-time77.531.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)4140

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services83.4
Public Administration and Safety5.6
Transport, Postal and Warehousing5.5
Education and Training5.4
Other Industries0.1

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateSurvey InterviewersAll Jobs Average
NSW39.531.8
VIC29.325.5
QLD17.719.8
SA4.46.8
WA011.2
TAS4.92
NT4.21.1
ACT01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketSurvey InterviewersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-196.3-5.45.4
20-2429.3-9.99.9
25-3415.3-23.423.4
35-440-21.721.7
45-5419.2-21.121.1
55-5918.4-8.78.7
60-643.1-5.95.9
65 and Over8.3-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategorySurvey InterviewersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males59Males53.6
Females41Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Survey Interviewers who have strong communication skills, interact well with others and who are reliable.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. English Language

    73% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    58% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. Computers and Electronics

    56% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  4. Telecommunications

    55% Important

    Transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.

  5. Clerical

    55% Important

    Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

Occupational Information Network Survey Researchers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    83% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Processing Information

    75% Important

    Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or checking information or data.

  3. Interacting With Computers

    73% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  4. Documenting/Recording Information

    72% Important

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

  5. Building Good Relationships

    71% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

Occupational Information Network Survey Researchers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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