Other Clerical and Office Support Workers includes occupations such as Classified Advertising Clerks, Meter Readers and Parking Inspectors.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary. Around one third of workers have Year 12 as their highest level of education.

Tasks

  • receives and records advertising copy for publication and broadcasting
  • reads electric, gas or water meters, records usage, inspects meters and connections for defects and damage, and reports irregularities
  • patrols assigned areas and issues parking infringement notices to owners of vehicles that are illegally parked

Job Titles

  • Classified Advertising Clerk
  • Meter Reader
  • Parking Inspector
  • Other Clerical and Office Support Workers
  • Classified Advertising Clerk

    Receives and records advertising copy for publication and broadcasting.

  • Meter Reader

    Reads electric, gas or water meters, records usage, inspects meters and connections for defects and damage, and reports irregularities.

  • Parking Inspector

    Patrols assigned areas and issues parking infringement notices to owners of vehicles that are illegally parked.

  • Other Clerical and Office Support Workers

    Includes Cash Processor, Media Monitor

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $925 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    moderate
  • Skill Level

    High School or Certificate I
  • Employment Size

    6,700
  • Unemployment

    above average
  • Male Share

    55.7%
  • Female Share

    44.3%
  • Full-Time Share

    44.5%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 6700 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen.
Moderate growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Other Clerical and Office Support Workers work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; Public Administration and Safety; and Administrative and Support Services.
  • Part-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 39.1 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $925 per week (lower than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The workforce is fairly mature. The average age is 49 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Around 2 in 10 workers are young (aged 15 to 25 years) and around 6 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 6 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was above average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200511400
200613000
20078900
200810300
200911200
20108800
201111700
20128400
20137300
20146600
20156700
20207000

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsOther Clerical and Office Support WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings9251230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther Clerical and Office Support WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-time44.568.4
Part-time55.531.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)39.140.0

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services27.4
Public Administration and Safety19.7
Administrative and Support Services14.2
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services12.6
Other Industries26.1

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateOther Clerical and Office Support WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW33.231.8
VIC30.525.5
QLD13.919.8
SA6.56.8
WA6.711.2
TAS2.72.0
NT1.91.1
ACT4.71.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketOther Clerical and Office Support WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-198.7-5.45.4
20-2413.3-9.99.9
25-3414.1-23.423.4
35-446.1-21.721.7
45-5419.6-21.121.1
55-5912.6-8.78.7
60-6416.9-5.95.9
65 and Over8.6-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther Clerical and Office Support WorkersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males55.7Males53.6
Females44.3Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary.
Around one third of workers have Year 12 as their highest level of education.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Clerical and Office Support Workers who have good computer skills, can communicate clearly and can interact with a variety of people.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. English Language

    75% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  2. Public Safety and Security

    75% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  3. Law and Government

    66% Important

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

  4. Computers and Electronics

    63% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  5. Education and Training

    62% Important

    Teaching and course design.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    88% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  2. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    87% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  3. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    86% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  4. Documenting/Recording Information

    86% Important

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

  5. Checking Compliance with Standards

    85% Important

    Deciding whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Occupational Information Network Parking Enforcement Workers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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