Service Station Attendants sell fuel, lubricants and other automotive accessories, and perform minor maintenance on motor vehicles at service stations.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary.

Tasks

  • filling fuel tanks and containers to level specified by customer
  • checking and replenishing air pressure in vehicle tyres, and oil and other vehicle fluid levels
  • washing vehicle windscreens and windows
  • performing minor repair work to vehicles such as replacing tyres, light bulbs and windscreen wiper blades
  • maintaining and operating automatic car wash facilities
  • collecting payments from customers for purchases
  • cleaning petrol pumps and surrounding driveway, shop and facilities
  • undertaking stock control and preparing reports on fuel, oil, accessories and other items sold
  • replenishing stock of fast foods, newspapers, magazines and grocery items

Job Titles

  • Service Station or Driveway Attendant

    Fast Facts

    • Avg. Weekly Pay

      Unavailable
    • Future Growth

      decline
    • Skill Level

      High School or Certificate I
    • Employment Size

      11,100
    • Unemployment

      above average
    • Male Share

      55.8%
    • Female Share

      44.2%
    • Full-Time Share

      39.7%

    Find Vacancies

    This is a small occupation employing 11,100 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
    A fall in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

    • Service Station Attendants work in most parts of Australia.
    • They mainly work in: Retail Trade; Wholesale Trade; and Manufacturing.
    • Part-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 37.1 hours per week.
    • Average earnings for full-time workers are low at around n/a per week. Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • The workforce is fairly young. The average age is 28 years (compared to 40 for all careers). Around 4 in 10 worker are young (aged 15 to 25 years).
    • Around 1 in 2 workers are female.
    • In 2016, the unemployment rate was above average.

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
    YearEmployment Level
    200510600
    20067400
    20077600
    20087500
    20096400
    20108200
    20119200
    201210700
    201311400
    20148700
    201511100
    202010800

    Weekly Earnings

    Full-time Earnings

    All Careers Average

    Weekly Earnings (before tax)

    Source: ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015 cat. no. 6333.0. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsService Station AttendantsAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earningsn/an/a

    Hours

    Weekly Hours Worked

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
    CategoryService Station AttendantsAll Jobs Average
    Full-time27.269
    Part-time72.830.8
    Average Weekly Hours (full-time)39.940.2

    Main Industries

    Top Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Retail Trade89.8
    Wholesale Trade4.8
    Manufacturing2.1
    Accommodation and Food Services1.3
    Other Industries2.0

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
    StateService Station AttendantsAll Jobs Average
    NSW28.831.8
    VIC28.025.5
    QLD24.019.8
    SA6.76.7
    WA7.611.1
    TAS2.72
    NT1.81.1
    ACT0.51.8

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
    Age BracketService Station AttendantsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-1914.1-5.45.4
    20-2425.4-9.99.9
    25-3421.6-23.323.3
    35-4412.5-21.621.6
    45-5412.7-21.121.1
    55-597.6-8.68.6
    60-644.1-5.95.9
    65 and Over1.9-3.73.7

    Gender

    Male Share

    Female Share

    Gender (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
    CategoryService Station AttendantsCategoryAll Jobs Average
    Males59.2Males53.8
    Females40.8Females46.1

    Education Level

    Top Education Levels

    Highest Level of Education (% share)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary.
    Around one in two workers have Year 12 as their highest level of education.
    If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
    The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

    It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

    Employers look for Service Station Attendants who are well presented and provide good customer service.

    Knowledge

    The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

    1. Customer and Personal Service

      93% Important

      Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    2. Mechanical

      88% Important

      Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

    3. Sales and Marketing

      80% Important

      Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

    4. Administration and Management

      75% Important

      Planning and coordination of people and resources.

    5. Mathematics

      65% Important

      Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

    Occupational Information Network Service Station Attendants Opens in a new window
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Activities

    The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

    1. Getting Information

      84% Important

      Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

    2. Controlling Machines and Processes

      81% Important

      Operate machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

    3. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

      77% Important

      Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

    4. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

      77% Important

      Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

    5. Communicating with Persons Outside Organization

      77% Important

      Communicating with customers, the public, government, and others in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

    Occupational Information Network Service Station Attendants Opens in a new window
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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