Models and Sales Demonstrators wear and display clothing and accessories and pose for art and photography, and demonstrate goods at commercial premises, exhibitions and private homes.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary. Around two in five workers have Year 12 as their highest level of education.

Tasks

  • modelling garments, footwear and fashion accessories for customers, sales personnel and fashion designers
  • posing for television, video and cinema commercials and for still photographs which appear in magazines, newspapers, catalogues and on billboards
  • posing as subjects for paintings, sculptures and other types of art
  • setting up displays and demonstrating goods to commercial customers and guests in private homes
  • answering questions and offering advice on the use of goods
  • selling goods or directing purchasers to sales counters
  • undertaking merchandising of goods in retail outlets and ensuring there is adequate stock attractively presented for sale
  • taking orders and making arrangements for payment, delivery and collection
  • offering sample goods and distributing catalogues and other literature advertising goods for sale

Job Titles

  • Model
  • Sales Demonstrator, or Merchandiser
  • Model

    Wears and displays clothing and accessories, and poses for photographs, paintings, sculptures and other types of art.

  • Sales Demonstrator, or Merchandiser

    Displays and demonstrates goods at commercial premises, exhibitions and private homes.

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $860 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    stable
  • Skill Level

    High School or Certificate I
  • Employment Size

    7,700
  • Unemployment

    above average
  • Male Share

    29.0%
  • Female Share

    71.0%
  • Full-Time Share

    28.6%

Find Vacancies

This is a small occupation employing 7700 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen.
Little change in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Models and Sales Demonstrators work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Retail Trade; Wholesale Trade; and Manufacturing.
  • Part-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 41.1 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $860 per week (lower than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 42 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 7 in 10 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was above average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200510100
20069300
200710300
200811800
20099800
201010400
20118000
201212200
20139700
201411200
20157700
20207700

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsModels and Sales DemonstratorsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings8601230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryModels and Sales DemonstratorsAll Jobs Average
Full-time28.668.4
Part-time71.431.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)41.140.0

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Retail Trade25.8
Wholesale Trade18.6
Manufacturing18.0
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services15.2
Other Industries22.4

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateModels and Sales DemonstratorsAll Jobs Average
NSW33.131.8
VIC24.225.5
QLD23.719.8
SA9.06.8
WA7.611.2
TAS1.02.0
NT0.41.1
ACT0.91.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketModels and Sales DemonstratorsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-191.9-5.45.4
20-2416.7-9.99.9
25-3422.3-23.423.4
35-4413.4-21.721.7
45-5421.7-21.121.1
55-597.9-8.78.7
60-649.5-5.95.9
65 and Over6.6-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryModels and Sales DemonstratorsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males29.0Males53.6
Females71.0Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary.
Around two in five workers have Year 12 as their highest level of education.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Models and Sales Demonstrators who interact well with others, provide good customer service and are reliable.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    80% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. English Language

    74% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Sales and Marketing

    74% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  4. Food Production

    66% Important

    Planting, growing, and harvesting food (both plant and animal), including storage and handling.

  5. Public Safety and Security

    60% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

Occupational Information Network Demonstrators and Product Promoters Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    95% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

  2. Selling or Influencing Others

    94% Important

    Convincing people to buy something or to change their minds or actions.

  3. Building Good Relationships

    83% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

  4. Communicating with Persons Outside Organization

    81% Important

    Communicating with customers, the public, government, and others in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

  5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    76% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Occupational Information Network Demonstrators and Product Promoters Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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