This group includes Sales Support Workers not covered elsewhere.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.

Tasks

  • no tasks are available for this occupation

Job Titles

  • Other Sales Support Workers
  • Other Sales Support Workers

    Specialisations: Mystery Shopper, Personal Shopper

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    stable
  • Skill Level

    High School or Certificate I
  • Employment Size

    4000
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    42.8%
  • Female Share

    57.2%
  • Full-Time Share

    38.9%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 4000 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown.
Little change in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create up to 5,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Other Sales Support Workers work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Retail Trade; Wholesale Trade; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
  • Part-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 38.4 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The average age is 44 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Around 2 in 10 workers are young (aged 15 to 25 years) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 6 in 10 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20051400
20062400
20072600
20082000
20092300
20103900
20111900
20122400
20132200
20141900
20154000
20203900

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther Sales Support WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-time38.968.4
Part-time61.131.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)38.440

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Retail Trade66
Wholesale Trade13.8
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services5.6
Health Care and Social Assistance4.9
Other Industries9.7

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateOther Sales Support WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW32.631.8
VIC31.125.5
QLD28.219.8
SA4.36.8
WA2.811.2
TAS02
NT11.1
ACT01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketOther Sales Support WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.7-5.45.4
20-2422.1-9.99.9
25-3413-23.423.4
35-4417-21.721.7
45-5426.1-21.121.1
55-597-8.78.7
60-642.3-5.95.9
65 and Over11.8-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther Sales Support WorkersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males42.8Males53.6
Females57.2Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Other Sales Support Workers who interact well with others, provide good customer service and who are reliable.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    70% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Sales and Marketing

    54% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  3. English Language

    48% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Public Safety and Security

    43% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  5. Mathematics

    43% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    88% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

  2. Getting Information

    81% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Handling and Moving Objects

    79% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  4. Performing General Physical Activities

    77% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

  5. Building Good Relationships

    74% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

Occupational Information Network Stock Clerks, Sales Floor Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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