Railway Track Workers lay and repair tracks for railways, tramways, quarries and mines, and install and repair signals and other equipment.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary.

Tasks

  • spreading and tamping ballast to provide firm foundation for sleepers
  • cutting rails to length and grinding worn and rough rail ends
  • placing sleepers across roadbeds, and positioning and fastening rails on sleepers
  • drilling bolt holes, and bolting and welding rail sections
  • removing and replacing worn and damaged rails, sleepers and switches
  • cleaning and lubricating switches
  • examining track, lubricating wheel bearings on rolling stock and maintaining switch signal lamps
  • installing and repairing signals and other equipment
  • may assist with the righting of derailed rolling stock

Job Titles

  • Railway Track Worker
  • Railway Track Worker

    Specialisations: Track Inspector

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    moderate
  • Skill Level

    Certificate II or III
  • Employment Size

    3800
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    92.4%
  • Female Share

    7.6%
  • Full-Time Share

    93.5%

Find Vacancies

This is a very small occupation employing 3,800 workers. The number of workers has grown moderately over the past 5 years.
Over the next 5 years (to May 2022) the number of workers is expected to grow moderately to 4,100. Around 4,000 job openings are likely over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created (a large number for an occupation of this size).

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Queensland has a large share of Railway Track Workers.
  • They work in many industries. Some of the main industries are: Transport, Postal and Warehousing; Construction; and Manufacturing.
  • Almost all work full-time. Full-time workers, on average, work 37.4 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The average age is 38 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • More than 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20076700
20085100
20095500
20107100
20116600
20123600
20133500
20145300
20153300
20166300
20173800
20224100

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Full-Time and Part-Time Status (% Share) and Average Weekly Hours (Full-Time)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryRailway Track WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-time93.568.4
Part-time6.531.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)37.440

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Transport, Postal and Warehousing71.7
Construction16.1
Manufacturing8.7
Arts and Recreation Services3.5

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateRailway Track WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW24.531.8
VIC14.625.5
QLD49.819.8
SA3.46.8
WA6.911.2
TAS0.72
NT01.1
ACT01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketRailway Track WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-243.7-9.99.9
25-3438.2-23.423.4
35-4420.6-21.721.7
45-5414.6-21.121.1
55-5913.1-8.78.7
60-649.8-5.95.9
65 and Over0-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryRailway Track WorkersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males92.4Males53.6
Females7.6Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Railway Track Workers who are motivated and hardworking.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Transportation

    73% Important

    Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

  2. Mechanical

    73% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  3. Building and Construction

    70% Important

    Materials, methods, and the tools used to construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.

  4. Public Safety and Security

    65% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  5. Administration and Management

    61% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 47-4061.00 - Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    93% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    89% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  3. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    89% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  4. Handling and Moving Objects

    89% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  5. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    88% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 47-4061.00 - Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators.

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