Massage Therapists perform therapeutic massage and administer body treatments for health, fitness and remedial purposes.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed, with the majority of workers having a Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed.

Tasks

  • massaging the soft tissues of the body, such as muscles, tendons and ligaments, to assist healing
  • utilising a range of massage techniques to enhance sports performance and prevent injury
  • administering treatments to promote relaxation, improve circulation and relieve muscle tension
  • assessing and treating specific soft tissue dysfunction and providing rehabilitation advice
  • employing other techniques, such as acupressure or Shiatsu, and complementary aids, such as infra-red lamps, wet compresses, ice, essential oils and herbal and mineral therapies, to assist recovery
  • assessing client's physical condition and case history and advising on stretching exercises and relaxation techniques

Job Titles

  • Massage Therapist
  • Massage Therapist

    Specialisations: Chinese (Tui-Na) Masseur, Remedial Masseur, Shiatsu Therapist, Sports Medicine Masseur, Thai Masseur

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    very strong
  • Skill Level

    Associate Degree or Diploma
  • Employment Size

    11800
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    31.9%
  • Female Share

    68.1%
  • Full-Time Share

    30.5%

Find Vacancies

This is a small occupation employing 11,800 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen.
Very strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Massage Therapists work in most parts of Australia.
  • They nearly all work in Health Care and Social Assistance.
  • Part-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 36.6 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The average age is 42 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years) and around 5 in 10 workers are aged 45 years or older.
  • Around 7 in 10 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200510600
20069400
200711800
200812100
200911700
201015200
201113900
201214500
201314300
201416900
201511800
202015100

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryMassage TherapistsAll Jobs Average
Full-time30.568.4
Part-time69.531.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)36.640

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Health Care and Social Assistance92.7
Other Services6.1
Arts and Recreation Services0.8
Public Administration and Safety0.2
Other Industries0.2

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateMassage TherapistsAll Jobs Average
NSW27.231.8
VIC35.425.5
QLD16.219.8
SA8.66.8
WA8.811.2
TAS2.12
NT0.61.1
ACT1.11.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketMassage TherapistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190-5.45.4
20-240.9-9.99.9
25-3427.7-23.423.4
35-4424.6-21.721.7
45-5423.5-21.121.1
55-5913.2-8.78.7
60-645.2-5.95.9
65 and Over4.8-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryMassage TherapistsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males31.9Males53.6
Females68.1Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed, with the majority of workers having a Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Massage Therapists who are caring, compassionate and empathetic and can communicate clearly with a diverse range of people.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    86% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. English Language

    65% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Biology

    65% Important

    Plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, how they rely on and work with each other and the environment.

  4. Sales and Marketing

    57% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  5. Clerical

    57% Important

    Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Performing General Physical Activities

    87% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

  2. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    87% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

  3. Getting Information

    82% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Assisting and Caring for Others

    81% Important

    Providing personal assistance, medical attention, or emotional support to people such as co-workers, customers, or patients.

  5. Building Good Relationships

    80% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

Occupational Information Network Massage Therapists Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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