Film, Television, Radio and Stage Directors direct the artistic and production aspects of film, television, radio and stage productions.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed. High levels of creative talent or personal commitment and interest are also important.

Tasks

  • studying scripts and scenarios to determine theme and setting
  • assessing locations and staging requirements for productions in association with specialist designers
  • overseeing creative aspects of film, television, radio and stage productions
  • determining lighting, film, shutter angles, filter factors, camera distance, depth of field and focus, angles of view and other variables to achieve desired mood and effect
  • viewing film and video tape to evaluate and select scenes and determine which scenes need to be re-shot
  • planning and organising the preparation and presentation of programs
  • supervising the positioning of scenery, props and lighting and sound equipment
  • assessing technical requirements of productions by studying scripts and discussing program content, set locations and stage directions with production team
  • creating, planning, writing scripts for, recording, videotaping and editing programs

Job Titles

  • Art Director (Film, Television or Stage) or Production Designer
  • Director (Film, Television, Radio or Stage)
  • Director of Photography, or Cinematographer
  • Film and Video Editor
  • Program Director (Television or Radio)
  • Stage Manager
  • Technical Director or Producer
  • Video Producer
  • Other Film, Television, Radio and Stage Directors
  • Art Director (Film, Television or Stage) or Production Designer

    Plans, organises and controls artistic aspects of film, television or stage productions.

  • Director (Film, Television, Radio or Stage)

    Interprets and approves selection of scripts, and directs and instructs cast and crew during filming, recording or performance of productions.

  • Director of Photography, or Cinematographer

    Plans, directs and coordinates filming to control the quality and style of photography in films or videos.

  • Film and Video Editor

    Makes and implements editorial decisions regarding mood, pace and climax of films, television programs, video productions or commercials.

  • Program Director (Television or Radio)

    Compiles and directs programs for television or radio.

  • Stage Manager

    Plans, organises, supervises and coordinates the activities of workers responsible for placing sets and properties, and operating lighting and sound equipment as part of film, television or stage productions.

  • Technical Director or Producer

    Controls the quality of pictures and sound for television or radio programs by directing technical teams and planning and organising technical facilities.

  • Video Producer

    Creates films, television programs, video productions or commercials by filming, adding sound and editing in digital or analogue format.

  • Other Film, Television, Radio and Stage Directors

    Includes Audio Director, Casting Director, Lighting Director, Location Manager (Film or Television)

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,488 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    strong
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    14,200
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    73.7%
  • Female Share

    26.3%
  • Full-Time Share

    85.5%

Find Vacancies

This is a medium sized occupation employing 14,200 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
Strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, New South Wales has a large share of Film, Television, Radio and Stage Directors.
  • They mainly work in: Information Media and Telecommunications; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Other Services.
  • Full-time work is very common. Full-time workers, on average, work 43.5 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,488 per week (higher than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 35 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Around 7 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20059100
20067600
20079800
20087500
200912500
20109700
20119200
20128300
201311700
20149600
201514200
202016100

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsFilm, Television, Radio and Stage DirectorsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings14881230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryFilm, Television, Radio and Stage DirectorsAll Jobs Average
Full-time85.568.4
Part-time14.531.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)43.540.0

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Information Media and Telecommunications87.4
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services6.0
Other Services2.6
Arts and Recreation Services1.7
Other Industries2.3

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateFilm, Television, Radio and Stage DirectorsAll Jobs Average
NSW64.631.8
VIC19.225.5
QLD6.919.8
SA3.26.8
WA4.911.2
TAS0.42.0
NT0.11.1
ACT0.81.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketFilm, Television, Radio and Stage DirectorsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.45.4
20-2412.5-9.99.9
25-3435.3-23.423.4
35-4428.8-21.721.7
45-5416.7-21.121.1
55-594.1-8.78.7
60-641.0-5.95.9
65 and Over1.5-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryFilm, Television, Radio and Stage DirectorsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males73.7Males53.6
Females26.3Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed. High levels of creative talent or personal commitment and interest are also important.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Film, Television, Radio and Stage Directors who have strong interpersonal skills, can communicate well with diverse audiences and who are organised and efficient.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Communications and Media

    89% Important

    Media production, communication, and dissemination. Includes written, spoken, and visual media.

  2. English Language

    84% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Telecommunications

    80% Important

    Transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.

  4. Computers and Electronics

    78% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  5. Production and Processing

    76% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

Occupational Information Network Directors- Stage, Motion Pictures, Television, and Radio Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    88% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Thinking Creatively

    86% Important

    Using your own ideas to developing, designing, or creating something new.

  3. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    85% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  4. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    84% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  5. Interacting With Computers

    82% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Occupational Information Network Directors- Stage, Motion Pictures, Television, and Radio Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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