Advertising and Marketing Professionals develop and coordinate advertising strategies and campaigns, determine the market for new goods and services, and identify and develop market opportunities for new and existing goods and services.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Over half of workers have a university degree. A high level of creativity may also be important.

Tasks

  • planning, developing and organising advertising policies and campaigns to support sales objectives
  • advising executives and clients on advertising strategies and campaigns to reach target markets, creating consumer awareness and effectively promoting the attributes of goods and services
  • coordinating production of advertising campaigns involving specialised activities, such as artwork, copywriting, media scripting, television and film production and media placement, within time and budget constraints
  • analysing data regarding consumer patterns and preferences
  • interpreting and predicting current and future consumer trends
  • researching potential demand and market characteristics for new goods and services and collecting and analysing data and other statistical information
  • supporting business growth and development through the preparation and execution of marketing objectives, policies and programs
  • commissioning and undertaking market research to identify market opportunities for new and existing goods and services
  • advising on all elements of marketing such as product mix, pricing, advertising and sales promotion, selling, and distribution channels

Job Titles

  • Advertising Specialist, Account Executive or Manager, or Creative Director
  • Market Research Analyst
  • Marketing Specialist, Consultant, Coordinator or Officer
  • Advertising Specialist, Account Executive or Manager, or Creative Director

    Devises and coordinates advertising campaigns which encourage consumers to purchase particular goods or services.

  • Market Research Analyst

    Determines the market for new goods and services, develops advertising strategies, and evaluates the best business sites for commercial organisations.

  • Marketing Specialist, Consultant, Coordinator or Officer

    Identifies market opportunities and advises on the development, coordination and implementation of plans for pricing and promoting an organisation's goods and services.

    Specialisations: Brand Manager, Category Manager, Product Manager, Sales Promotion Officer

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,346 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    strong
  • Skill Level

    Bachelor Degree or higher
  • Employment Size

    55,000
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    39.6%
  • Female Share

    60.4%
  • Full-Time Share

    77.6%

Find Vacancies

This is a very large occupation employing 55,000 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
Strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 25,001 and 50,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, New South Wales has a large share of Advertising and Marketing Professionals.
  • They work in many industries. Some of the main industries are: Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; Manufacturing; and Retail Trade.
  • Full-time work is common. Full-time workers, on average, work 40.0 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,346 per week (higher than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The workforce is fairly young. The average age is 34 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Around 6 in 10 workers are female.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200539700
200642500
200741000
200840300
200951700
201048600
201146200
201253800
201346600
201459700
201555000
202063600

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsAdvertising and Marketing ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings13461230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryAdvertising and Marketing ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
Full-time77.668.4
Part-time22.431.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)40.040.0

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services34.2
Manufacturing10.3
Retail Trade7.3
Wholesale Trade7.2
Other Industries41.0

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateAdvertising and Marketing ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
NSW44.531.8
VIC30.125.5
QLD11.219.8
SA4.16.8
WA7.811.2
TAS0.52.0
NT0.31.1
ACT1.31.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketAdvertising and Marketing ProfessionalsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.6-5.45.4
20-2413.9-9.99.9
25-3438.9-23.423.4
35-4426.3-21.721.7
45-5413.7-21.121.1
55-592.2-8.78.7
60-642.3-5.95.9
65 and Over2.1-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryAdvertising and Marketing ProfessionalsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males39.6Males53.6
Females60.4Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationAdvertising and Marketing ProfessionalsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate17.7-8.68.6
Bachelor degree49.1-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma6.2-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV8.4-18.918.9
Year 1215.5-18.718.7
Years 11 & 103.1-17.717.7
Below Year 100.0-8.18.1

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Over half of workers have a university degree. A high level of creativity may also be important.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Advertising and Marketing Professionals who have strong interpersonal skills and are highly organised.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. English Language

    87% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  2. Communications and Media

    87% Important

    Media production, communication, and dissemination. Includes written, spoken, and visual media.

  3. Administration and Management

    82% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  4. Sales and Marketing

    78% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  5. Customer and Personal Service

    76% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Communicating with Persons Outside Organization

    91% Important

    Communicating with customers, the public, government, and others in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

  2. Thinking Creatively

    91% Important

    Using your own ideas to developing, designing, or creating something new.

  3. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    89% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  4. Getting Information

    88% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    86% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Occupational Information Network Advertising and Promotions Managers Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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