Sportspersons participate in sporting events for monetary gain either as individuals or as members of a team.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Even with a qualification, further on-the-job training is needed. A high levels of physical fitness, sporting ability and personal commitment is important. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • maintaining a high degree of expertise in a particular sport
  • attending regular practice sessions and undertaking private training to maintain the required standard of fitness
  • deciding on strategies in consultation with coaches
  • assessing other competitors and conditions at venues
  • competing in sporting events
  • adhering to the rules and regulations associated with a specific sport
  • promoting water safety awareness and undertaking rescue of persons in difficulty in the water
  • undertaking sports promotional activities and television appearances

Job Titles

  • Footballer
  • Golfer
  • Jockey
  • Lifeguard
  • Other Sportspersons
  • Footballer

    Plays football professionally in competitions. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Australian Rules Footballer, Rugby League Footballer, Rugby Union Footballer, Soccer Player

  • Golfer

    Plays golf professionally in tournaments or as a resident professional, and organises golf-related activities. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Jockey

    Rides horses in competitive races, race trials, and in exercise. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Apprentice Jockey, Steeplechase Jockey

  • Lifeguard

    Looks after the safety of people at beaches or swimming pools through accident prevention and rescue, and educating the public on water safety. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Other Sportspersons

    Includes Athlete, Cricketer, Cyclist, Racing Driver, Surfer, Tennis Player

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    very strong
  • Skill Level

    Certificate III or IV
  • Employment Size

    13600
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    77.8%
  • Female Share

    22.2%
  • Full-Time Share

    54.9%

Find Vacancies

This is a medium sized occupation employing 13,600 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
Very strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 5,001 and 10,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Sportspersons work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Arts and Recreation Services; Education and Training; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Part-time work is fairly common, but more than half work full-time. Full-time workers, on average, work 38.2 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The workforce is fairly young. The average age is 23 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Around 6 in 10 workers are young (aged 15 to 25 years).
  • Around 8 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20057900
20068200
200710500
200811100
20098800
201010000
201111100
201211600
20139000
20149400
201513600
202016700

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategorySportspersonsAll Jobs Average
Full-time54.968.4
Part-time45.131.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)38.240

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Arts and Recreation Services80.2
Education and Training6.7
Public Administration and Safety5.7
Accommodation and Food Services4.5
Other Industries2.9

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateSportspersonsAll Jobs Average
NSW41.631.8
VIC23.325.5
QLD20.519.8
SA56.8
WA5.911.2
TAS02
NT0.31.1
ACT3.41.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketSportspersonsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-1927.8-5.45.4
20-2431.8-9.99.9
25-3426.8-23.423.4
35-442-21.721.7
45-547.1-21.121.1
55-591.7-8.78.7
60-640.7-5.95.9
65 and Over1.9-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategorySportspersonsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males77.8Males53.6
Females22.2Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Even with a qualification, further on-the-job training is needed. A high levels of physical fitness, sporting ability and personal commitment is important. Registration or licensing may be required.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Sportspersons who are motivated, have a positive attitude and have a strong work ethic.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Administration and Management

    74% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  2. English Language

    74% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Customer and Personal Service

    72% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  4. Personnel and Human Resources

    68% Important

    Recruiting and training people. Managing pay and other entitlements like sick and holiday leave. Negotiating pay and conditions.

  5. Communications and Media

    66% Important

    Media production, communication, and dissemination. Includes written, spoken, and visual media.

Occupational Information Network Athletes and Sports Competitors Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    84% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    81% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  3. Analyzing Data or Information

    80% Important

    Looking at, working with, and understanding data or information.

  4. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    79% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  5. Performing General Physical Activities

    78% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

Occupational Information Network Athletes and Sports Competitors Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

go to top