Information Officers respond to personal, written and telephone inquiries and complaints about the organisation's goods and services, provide information and refer people to other sources.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed. Around one third of workers have a Certificate III or higher Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification. Even with a qualification, further experience or on-the-job training is sometimes required.

Tasks

  • answering inquiries about goods and services, and providing information about their availability, location, price and related issues
  • responding to inquiries about problems and providing advice, information and assistance
  • recording information about inquiries and complaints
  • referring complex inquiries to team leaders or expert advisers
  • issuing relevant forms, information kits and brochures to interested parties
  • accessing and operating computer network systems and communication systems such as public address and paging systems
  • may refer inquiries to other sources

Job Titles

  • Information Officer

    Fast Facts

    • Avg. Weekly Pay

      $978 Before Tax
    • Future Growth

      stable
    • Skill Level

      Certificate II or III
    • Employment Size

      69,300
    • Unemployment

      average
    • Male Share

      29.2%
    • Female Share

      70.8%
    • Full-Time Share

      70.1%

    Find Vacancies

    This is a very large occupation employing 69,300 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
    Little change in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create more than 50,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

    • Information Officers work in most parts of Australia.
    • They work in many industries. Some of the main industries are: Public Administration and Safety; Financial and Insurance Services; and Retail Trade.
    • Full-time work is fairly common. Full-time workers, on average, work 36.3 hours per week.
    • Average earnings for full-time workers are below average at around $978 per week. Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • The average age is 37 years (compared to 40 for all careers).
    • Around 1 in 3 workers are male.
    • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
    YearEmployment Level
    200567300
    200670300
    200763200
    200871700
    200975800
    201061600
    201167800
    201267100
    201369400
    201477700
    201569300
    202067100

    Weekly Earnings

    Full-time Earnings

    All Careers Average

    Weekly Earnings (before tax)

    Source: ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015 cat. no. 6333.0. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsInformation OfficersAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings9781230

    Hours

    Weekly Hours Worked

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
    CategoryInformation OfficersAll Jobs Average
    Full-time74.269
    Part-time25.830.8
    Average Weekly Hours (full-time)35.440.2

    Main Industries

    Top Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Public Administration and Safety25.7
    Financial and Insurance Services10.5
    Retail Trade7.4
    Transport, Postal and Warehousing6.7
    Other Industries49.7

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
    StateInformation OfficersAll Jobs Average
    NSW37.431.8
    VIC28.625.5
    QLD15.519.8
    SA5.96.7
    WA7.711.1
    TAS1.92
    NT1.31.1
    ACT1.91.8

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
    Age BracketInformation OfficersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-193.7-5.45.4
    20-2412.5-9.99.9
    25-3427.2-23.323.3
    35-4425.0-21.621.6
    45-5416.7-21.121.1
    55-598.2-8.68.6
    60-644.7-5.95.9
    65 and Over2.0-3.73.7

    Gender

    Male Share

    Female Share

    Gender (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016.
    CategoryInformation OfficersCategoryAll Jobs Average
    Males32.8Males53.8
    Females67.2Females46.1

    Education Level

    Top Education Levels

    Highest Level of Education (% share)

    Source: Based on ABS 2016 Survey of Education and Work (SEW).
    Type of QualificationInformation OfficersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate10.6-8.58.5
    Bachelor degree14.0-17.817.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma14.3-10.110.1
    Certificate III/IV21.3-18.818.8
    Year 1226.0-18.618.6
    Years 11 & 1013.8-17.617.6
    Below Year 100.0-8.08.0

    A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed.
    Around one third of workers have Year 12 as their highest education level. Even with a qualification, further experience or on-the-job training is sometimes required.
    If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
    The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

    It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

    Employers look for Information Officers who can communicate clearly with others and provide good customer service.

    Knowledge

    The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

    1. Clerical

      84% Important

      Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

    2. Customer and Personal Service

      82% Important

      Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    3. English Language

      78% Important

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    4. Computers and Electronics

      67% Important

      Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

    5. Administration and Management

      54% Important

      Planning and coordination of people and resources.

    Occupational Information Network Receptionists and Information Clerks Opens in a new window
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Activities

    The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

    1. Interacting With Computers

      94% Important

      Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

    2. Performing Administrative Activities

      91% Important

      Doing day-to-day office work such as filing and processing paperwork.

    3. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

      90% Important

      Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

    4. Getting Information

      88% Important

      Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

    5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

      84% Important

      Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

    Occupational Information Network Receptionists and Information Clerks Opens in a new window
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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