Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons includes occupations such as Materials Recyclers and Rental Salespersons.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary.

Tasks

  • salvages materials from industrial, commercial and private establishments for resale
  • rents goods and equipment to individuals and businesses

Job Titles

  • Materials Recycler
  • Rental Salesperson
  • Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons
  • Materials Recycler (also called Scrap Materials Buyer)

    Salvages materials from industrial, commercial and private establishments for resale.

    Specialisations: Automotive Dismantler, Bottle Dealer, Waste Recycler

  • Rental Salesperson (also called Rental Clerk)

    Rents goods and equipment to individuals and businesses.

    Specialisations: Car Rental Sales Assistant, Industrial Hire Sales Assistant, Video Library Assistant

  • Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons

    Includes Carpet Measurer, Lotteries Agent, Swimming Pool Salesperson

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    $1,095 Before Tax
  • Future Growth

    stable
  • Skill Level

    High School or Certificate I
  • Employment Size

    12800
  • Unemployment

    average
  • Male Share

    54.9%
  • Female Share

    45.1%
  • Full-Time Share

    64.1%

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This is a medium sized occupation employing 12,800 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has fallen.
Little change in the number of jobs is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 10,001 and 25,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons work in most parts of Australia.
  • They mainly work in: Retail Trade; Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services; and Wholesale Trade.
  • Full-time work is fairly common. Full-time workers, on average, work 41.7 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • Average earnings for full-time workers are around $1,095 per week (below the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • The average age is 38 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Around 5 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was similar to the average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
20058200
20066300
20078800
200812100
20099600
201016400
201112900
201216300
201314800
201411500
201512800
202013000

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsOther Sales Assistants and SalespersonsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings10951230

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther Sales Assistants and SalespersonsAll Jobs Average
Full-time64.168.4
Part-time35.931.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)41.740

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Retail Trade28.7
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services26.5
Wholesale Trade25
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services5.6
Other Industries14.2

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateOther Sales Assistants and SalespersonsAll Jobs Average
NSW31.531.8
VIC30.225.5
QLD1419.8
SA5.66.8
WA11.811.2
TAS42
NT2.91.1
ACT01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketOther Sales Assistants and SalespersonsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-196.6-5.45.4
20-2412.9-9.99.9
25-3424.7-23.423.4
35-4415.2-21.721.7
45-5420.9-21.121.1
55-596.4-8.78.7
60-648.1-5.95.9
65 and Over5.2-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther Sales Assistants and SalespersonsCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males54.9Males53.6
Females45.1Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Sales Assistants and Sales Persons who interact well with others, provide good customer service and have an enthusiastic and positive attitude.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    86% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Sales and Marketing

    78% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  3. English Language

    67% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Mathematics

    60% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  5. Administration and Management

    57% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    93% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

  2. Selling or Influencing Others

    91% Important

    Convincing people to buy something or to change their minds or actions.

  3. Getting Information

    83% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Building Good Relationships

    78% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

  5. Communicating with Persons Outside Organization

    76% Important

    Communicating with customers, the public, government, and others in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Occupational Information Network Sales and Related Workers, All Other Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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