Other Cleaners clean surfaces, materials and objects, such as carpets, windows, walls, swimming pools and cooling towers, using specialised cleaning equipment and chemicals. Carpet Cleaners and Window Cleaners are included here.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job. Around one in four workers have a Certificate III or IV.

Tasks

  • cleaning carpets and upholstered furniture using cleaning machines and their attachments
  • selecting and applying cleaning agents to remove stains from carpets, windows and surfaces
  • filling carpet cleaning machines with water and other cleaning agents
  • pushing pile-lifting machines over carpets and brushing pile to raise and fluff nap
  • treating carpets with soil-repellent chemicals and deodorants, and treating for pests
  • using ladders, swinging scaffolds, bosun's chairs, hydraulic bucket trucks and other equipment to reach and clean windows in multi-storey buildings
  • cleaning stone walls, metal surfaces, fascias and window frames using high pressure water cleaners and solvents
  • applying chemicals and high pressure cleaning methods to remove micro-organisms from water and filtration systems, and using wet vacuums and other suction equipment to remove scale, accumulated dirt and other deposits from swimming pools, cooling tower components and drains

Job Titles

  • Carpet Cleaner
  • Window Cleaner
  • Other Cleaners
  • Carpet Cleaner

    Cleans carpets, rugs and furniture upholstery using powder, liquid and steam cleaning methods, and applies soil-repellent chemicals and deodorants.

    Specialisations: Upholstery Cleaner

  • Window Cleaner

    Cleans interior and exterior window surfaces.

  • Other Cleaners

    Includes Chimney Sweep, Graffiti Cleaner, High Pressure Cleaner, Swimming Pool Cleaner

Fast Facts

  • Avg. Weekly Pay

    Unavailable
  • Future Growth

    strong
  • Skill Level

    High School or Certificate I
  • Employment Size

    15100
  • Unemployment

    above average
  • Male Share

    91.4%
  • Female Share

    8.6%
  • Full-Time Share

    50.9%

Find Vacancies

This is a medium sized occupation employing 15,100 workers. Over the past 5 years the number of jobs has grown strongly.
Strong growth is expected in the future. New jobs and turnover from workers leaving may create between 10,001 and 25,000 job openings over the 5 years to 2020.

  • While there are jobs in many parts of Australia, Victoria and Western Australia have a large share of Other Cleaners.
  • They mainly work in: Administrative and Support Services; Other Services; and Construction.
  • Part-time work is fairly common, but more than half work full-time. Full-time workers, on average, work 40.2 hours per week (compared to the all jobs average of 40 hours).
  • The average age is 42 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • More than 9 in 10 workers are male.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate was above average.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Employment trend data to November 2015 and Department of Employment projections to 2020.
YearNumber of Workers
200516900
200617500
200713600
200812000
200911900
201012200
20119500
201213600
201315400
201412900
201515100
202016700

Weekly Earnings

Full-time Earnings

All Jobs Average

Weekly Earnings (before tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Hours

Weekly Hours Worked

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Hours actually worked by people who usually work full-time, and share of employment by full-time and part-time status, for this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther CleanersAll Jobs Average
Full-time50.968.4
Part-time49.131.6
Average Weekly Hours (full-time)40.240

Main Industries

Top Industries

Main Employing Industries (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Administrative and Support Services45
Other Services26.4
Construction9.2
Public Administration and Safety5.8
Other Industries13.6

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateOther CleanersAll Jobs Average
NSW25.431.8
VIC36.725.5
QLD1319.8
SA5.76.8
WA17.511.2
TAS1.52
NT0.11.1
ACT0.21.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketOther CleanersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-195.4-5.45.4
20-244.9-9.99.9
25-3429.7-23.423.4
35-4420.9-21.721.7
45-5422.5-21.121.1
55-595.2-8.78.7
60-646-5.95.9
65 and Over5.5-3.83.8

Gender

Male Share

Female Share

Gender (% share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2016, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Male and female share of employment in this job compared to the all jobs average.
CategoryOther CleanersCategoryAll Jobs Average
Males91.4Males53.6
Females8.6Females46.4

Education Level

Top Education Levels

Highest Level of Education (% share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationOther CleanersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0-8.68.6
Bachelor degree0-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma8.4-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV32.3-18.918.9
Year 1231.6-18.718.7
Years 11 & 1018.7-17.717.7
Below Year 109-8.18.1

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.
Around one in four workers have a Certificate III or IV.

If you are interested in this style of work, there are a wide range of training options available that could lead to this or a similar job.
The pathway that is right for you will depend on your skills and interests.

It is a good idea to speak to industry bodies, employers, and workers to learn more about the skills and qualifications you will need.

Employers look for Other Laundry Workers who are reliable and hardworking.

Knowledge

The topics, subjects, or knowledge areas workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    66% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Transportation

    59% Important

    Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

  3. Administration and Management

    57% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  4. English Language

    56% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Public Safety and Security

    55% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

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O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

The work activities workers rate as most important are shown below.

  1. Getting Information

    70% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Performing General Physical Activities

    70% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

  3. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    67% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  4. Handling and Moving Objects

    60% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  5. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    60% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

Occupational Information Network Cleaners of Vehicles and Equipment Opens in a new window
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The information on this site is derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2

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