Construction Managers plan, organise, direct, control and coordinate the construction of civil engineering projects, buildings and dwellings, and the physical and human resources involved in building and construction.

A skill level equal to a Bachelor Degree or higher is usually needed. Workers normally have at least 5 years of relevant experience instead and around half have a Certificate III/IV as their highest level of education.

Tasks

  • interpreting architectural drawings and specifications
  • coordinating labour resources, and procurement and delivery of materials, plant and equipment
  • consulting with Architects, Engineering Professionals and other professionals, and Technical and Trades Workers
  • negotiating with building owners, property developers and subcontractors involved in the construction process to ensure projects are completed on time and within budget
  • preparing tenders and contract bids
  • operating and implementing coordinated work programs for sites
  • ensuring adherence to building legislation and standards of performance, quality, cost and safety
  • arranging submission of plans to local authorities
  • building under contract, or subcontracting specialised building services
  • overseeing the standard and progress of subcontractors' work
  • arranging building inspections by local authorities

Job Titles

  • Construction Project Manager
  • Project Builder, or Professional Builder
  • Construction Project Manager (also called Building and Construction Manager)

    Manages civil engineering and building projects. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Project Builder, or Professional Builder

    Manages the construction, alteration and renovation of dwellings and other buildings. Registration or licensing is required.

Fast Facts

  • $1,719 Weekly Pay
  • 89,600 workers Employment Size
  • Strong Future Growth
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 91.2% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 44.6 hours Average full-time
  • 44 years Average age
  • 7.3% female Gender Share

The number of Construction Managers grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow strongly over the next 5 years:
from 89,600 in 2017 to 100,900 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 47,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a very large occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Construction Managers work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Construction; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,719 per week (very high compared to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (91.2%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%) showing part-time work may be hard to find.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 44.6 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 44 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 7.3% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200761400
200868700
200980000
201078400
201175000
201273100
201374700
201475800
201581700
201689400
201789600
2022100900

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsConstruction ManagersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings17191230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Construction76.7
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services9.0
Public Administration and Safety3.4
Manufacturing3.0
Other Industries7.9

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateConstruction ManagersAll Jobs Average
NSW38.331.6
VIC25.226.2
QLD17.019.7
SA4.46.7
WA8.510.8
TAS3.02.0
NT1.31.1
ACT2.21.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketConstruction ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.1-5.25.2
20-244.5-9.99.9
25-3422.5-23.623.6
35-4425.2-21.721.7
45-5425.7-20.820.8
55-5910.1-8.88.8
60-646.7-6.06.0
65 and Over5.1-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationConstruction ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate4.9-8.68.6
Bachelor degree16.7-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma12.7-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV47.9-18.918.9
Year 1210.8-18.718.7
Years 11 & 105.7-17.717.7
Below Year 101.3-8.18.1

A skill level equal to a Bachelor Degree or higher is usually needed. Workers normally have at least 5 years of relevant experience instead and around half have a Certificate III/IV as their highest level of education.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Construction, Plumbing and Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Construction Managers who are organised, with strong people skills and an enthusiastic, positive attitude.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Building and Construction

    96% Important

    Materials, methods, and the tools used to construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.

  2. English Language

    84% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Administration and Management

    81% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  4. Engineering and Technology

    81% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  5. Design

    77% Important

    Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 11-9021.00 - Construction Managers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    92% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  2. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    92% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  3. Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others

    87% Important

    Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving conflicts, and negotiating with people.

  4. Scheduling Work and Activities

    85% Important

    Working out the timing of events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

  5. Getting Information

    84% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 11-9021.00 - Construction Managers.

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