Air Transport Professionals fly and navigate aircraft, control and direct air traffic to ensure the safe and efficient operation of aircraft in flight and on the ground, and instruct students in flying aircraft.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Around two in five workers have a university degree. Aeroplane and Helicopter Pilots require a minimum amount of flying experience in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing is mandatory.

Tasks

  • preparing and submitting flight plans giving consideration to factors such as weather conditions and aircraft performance
  • flying aircraft in accordance with established air traffic control and aircraft operating procedures
  • providing flight information for flight crews and air traffic services staff
  • controlling aircraft movements, and directing aircraft taxiing, take-offs and landings by radio
  • providing pre-flight briefings and aeronautical information services
  • completing cockpit preparations and external inspections to determine that aircraft are acceptable for flight
  • monitoring aircraft performance and reporting on mechanical condition
  • giving in-flight instruction, supervising solo flights, accompanying students on training flights and demonstrating techniques for controlling aircraft

Job Titles

  • Aeroplane Pilot
  • Air Traffic Controller
  • Flying Instructor
  • Helicopter Pilot
  • Other Air Transport Professionals
  • Aeroplane Pilot

    Flies aeroplanes to transport passengers, mail and freight, or provide agricultural, aerial surveillance or other aviation services. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Air Traffic Controller

    Ensures the safe and efficient movement of aircraft in controlled airspace and aerodromes by directing aircraft movements. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Flying Instructor

    Teaches the theory and practical skills of flying aircraft. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Gliding Pilot Instructor, Helicopter Pilot Instructor

  • Helicopter Pilot

    Flies helicopters to transport passengers, mail or freight, or provide agricultural, aviation or aerial surveillance services. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Other Air Transport Professionals

    Includes Aircraft Navigator, Airworthiness Inspector, Balloonist, Flight Engineer Inspector. Registration or licensing is required.

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 12,700 workers Employment Size
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • Average unemployment Unemployment
  • 85.4% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 35.7 hours Average full-time
  • 42 years Average age
  • 15.4% female Gender Share

The number of Air Transport Professionals fell over the past 5 years and is expected to stay fairly stable over the next 5 years:
from 12,700 in 2017 to 12,900 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 2,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created (a small number for an occupation of this size).

  • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2017.
  • Location: Air Transport Professionals work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Transport, Postal and Warehousing; Public Administration and Safety; and Education and Training.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (85.4%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 35.7 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 42 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 15.4% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20079400
200810100
200913000
20108200
201115500
201214300
201315900
201414000
201514300
201613300
201712700
202212900

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Transport, Postal and Warehousing69.4
Public Administration and Safety15.3
Education and Training9.4
Health Care and Social Assistance1.7
Other Industries4.2

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateAir Transport ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
NSW27.131.6
VIC22.326.2
QLD27.019.7
SA6.96.7
WA11.510.8
TAS0.02.0
NT3.51.1
ACT1.61.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketAir Transport ProfessionalsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-192.1-5.25.2
20-246.0-9.99.9
25-3426.5-23.623.6
35-4424.6-21.721.7
45-5427.9-20.820.8
55-597.1-8.88.8
60-644.8-6.06.0
65 and Over0.9-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job.
Around two in five workers have a university degree. Aeroplane and Helicopter Pilots require a minimum amount of flying experience in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing is mandatory.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Aviation Industry VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Air Transport Professionals who work well in a team, can communicate clearly and are reliable.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Transportation

    95% Important

    Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

  2. Geography

    81% Important

    Describing land, sea, and air, including their physical characteristics, locations, how they work together, and the location of plant, animal, and human life.

  3. Mathematics

    80% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  4. English Language

    74% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Computers and Electronics

    73% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-2011.00 - Airline Pilots, Copilots, and Flight Engineers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    97% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  2. Controlling Machines and Processes

    95% Important

    Operate machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

  3. Getting Information

    95% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    93% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  5. Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings

    93% Important

    Checking objects, actions, or events, keeping an eye out for problems.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-2011.00 - Airline Pilots, Copilots, and Flight Engineers.

go to top