ICT Business and Systems Analysts work with users to formulate system requirements, develop system plans and documentation, review and evaluate existing systems, and design and modify systems to meet users' business needs.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Around three quarters of workers have a university degree. System Analysts may also need vendor certifications.

Tasks

  • working with users to formulate and document business requirements
  • identifying, investigating, and analysing business processes, procedures and work practices
  • identifying and evaluating inefficiencies and recommending optimal business practices, and system functionality and behaviour
  • using project management methodologies, principles and techniques to develop project plans and to cost, resource and manage projects
  • taking responsibility for deploying functional solutions, such as creating, adopting and implementing system test plans, which ensure acceptable quality and integrity of the system
  • creating user and training documentation, and conducting formal training classes
  • developing functional specifications for use by system developers
  • using data and process modelling techniques to create clear system specifications for the design and development of system software
  • acting as a central reference and information source, providing guidance and assistance in the system project decision making process

Job Titles

  • ICT Business Analyst, BA (ICT), or Business Consultant (ICT)
  • Systems Analyst
  • ICT Business Analyst, BA (ICT), or Business Consultant (ICT)

    Identifies and communicates with users to formulate and produce a requirements specification to create system and software solutions.

    Specialisations: Business Systems Analyst

  • Systems Analyst

    Evaluates processes and methods used in existing ICT systems, proposes modifications, additional system components or new systems to meet user needs as expressed in specifications and other documentation.

Fast Facts

  • $1,819 Weekly Pay
  • 26,100 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • Average unemployment Unemployment
  • 92.6% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 39.7 hours Average full-time
  • 42 years Average age
  • 28.5% female Gender Share

The number of ICT Business and Systems Analysts fell over the past 5 years and is expected to grow moderately over the next 5 years:
from 26,100 in 2017 to 27,000 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 12,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a large occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2017.
  • Location: ICT Business and Systems Analysts work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; Financial and Insurance Services; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,819 per week (very high compared to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (92.6%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%) showing part-time work may be hard to find.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 39.7 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 42 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 28.5% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200724700
200824900
200923400
201027900
201124400
201232700
201326200
201432600
201522700
201624900
201726100
202227000

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsICT Business and Systems AnalystsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings18191230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services44.4
Financial and Insurance Services12.4
Public Administration and Safety10.3
Information Media and Telecommunications8.2
Other Industries24.7

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateICT Business and Systems AnalystsAll Jobs Average
NSW38.431.6
VIC26.426.2
QLD13.619.7
SA6.46.7
WA8.110.8
TAS0.92.0
NT0.41.1
ACT5.91.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketICT Business and Systems AnalystsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.25.2
20-240.1-9.99.9
25-3421.1-23.623.6
35-4439.4-21.721.7
45-5427.1-20.820.8
55-597.9-8.88.8
60-643.9-6.06.0
65 and Over0.5-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job.
Around three quarters of workers have a university degree. System Analysts may also need vendor certifications.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Information and Communications Technology VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for ICT Business and Systems Analysts who can communicate clearly, work well in a team and have strong interpersonal skills.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Computers and Electronics

    92% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  2. English Language

    80% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Customer and Personal Service

    71% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  4. Mathematics

    70% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  5. Engineering and Technology

    65% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 15-1121.00 - Computer Systems Analysts.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Interacting With Computers

    97% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  2. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    89% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  3. Processing Information

    89% Important

    Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or checking information or data.

  4. Getting Information

    84% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  5. Checking Compliance with Standards

    83% Important

    Deciding whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 15-1121.00 - Computer Systems Analysts.

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