Safety Inspectors inspect machines, equipment, working conditions and public places to ensure compliance with government and industry standards and regulations, in relation to occupational health and safety.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is usually needed. Registration or licensing may also be required.

Tasks

  • examining equipment specifications, and inspecting and testing machines, equipment and clothing to ensure compliance with safety standards and serviceability
  • inspecting factories and other work sites to ensure compliance with government and industry standards and regulations
  • observing workers to ensure protective devices are being utilised according to regulations and that combustible and other hazardous materials are used and stored in accordance with approved procedures
  • conducting tests in work areas to detect toxic fumes, explosive gas-air mixtures and other work hazards
  • ensuring fire prevention equipment and other safety supplies, such as first aid kits, stretchers and blankets, conform to standards
  • assisting in conducting safety meetings and campaigns, and organising training in general safety principles in keeping with regulations
  • advising organisations on ways to comply with occupational health and safety legislative requirements
  • investigating incidents and fatalities, to determine causes and to collect evidence of non-compliance with occupational health and safety legislation

Job Titles

  • Safety Inspector
  • Safety Inspector

    Specialisations: Boilers and Pressure Vessels Inspector, Gas Examiner, Lifts and Cranes Inspector, Mines Inspector, Occupational Health and Safety Inspector

Fast Facts

  • $2,121 Weekly Pay
  • 4,500 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • High skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 78.6% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 35.1 hours Average full-time
  • 54 years Average age
  • 25.6% female Gender Share

The number of Safety Inspectors fell over the past 5 years and is expected to grow over the next 5 years:
from 4,500 in 2018 to 4,800 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 2,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 400 a year).

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Safety Inspectors work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Public Administration and Safety; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Mining.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $2,121 per week (very high compared to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (78.6%, higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 35.1 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 54 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (55.8%).
  • Gender: 25.6% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
20084800
20093300
20104000
20114100
20123500
20134800
20144100
20157800
20163400
20174100
20184500
20234800

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsSafety InspectorsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings21211230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Public Administration and Safety27.5
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services26.2
Mining8.4
Construction8.0
Other Industries29.9

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateSafety InspectorsAll Jobs Average
NSW39.131.6
VIC6.026.2
QLD29.119.7
SA4.86.7
WA15.610.8
TAS0.02.0
NT3.41.1
ACT2.11.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketSafety InspectorsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.25.2
20-240.0-9.99.9
25-348.0-23.623.6
35-4436.2-21.721.7
45-5415.8-20.820.8
55-5916.8-8.88.8
60-6417.4-6.06.0
65 and Over5.8-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is usually needed. Registration or licensing may also be required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Public Sector and Public Safety VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Safety Inspectors who are reliable, trustworthy, responsible and organised.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Engineering and Technology

    88% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  2. English Language

    85% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Public Safety and Security

    85% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  4. Chemistry

    85% Important

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change. Danger signs and disposal methods.

  5. Law and Government

    80% Important

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 17-2111.01 - Industrial Safety and Health Engineers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Checking Compliance with Standards

    96% Important

    Deciding whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

  2. Getting Information

    95% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    91% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  4. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

    88% Important

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

  5. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    87% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 17-2111.01 - Industrial Safety and Health Engineers.

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