Metal Casting, Forging and Finishing Trades Workers fabricate mould patterns and form sand moulds and cores for the production of metal castings, heat and hammer metal into shape, and make, repair, coat and polish metal parts and articles.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification.

Tasks

  • selecting metal stock for job requirements
  • heating metal in forges and furnaces and hammering, punching and cutting metal using hand tools and machine presses
  • tempering and hardening finished articles by quenching in oil or water baths or by cooling gradually in air
  • preparing electrolytic and silver solutions for electroforming, and applying solution to the objects to be coated
  • setting and adjusting controls to regulate electric current and depositing of coating on objects
  • preparing horses' hooves for shoeing, nailing horseshoes to hooves, and trimming hooves
  • cutting, trimming, shaping and smoothing stock to form mould patterns
  • filling boxes with sand and setting patterns in place, and pouring molten metal into moulds
  • applying refractory paint and positioning cores in moulds
  • finishing metal and articles by polishing and buffing and applying shellac, lacquer, paint and other finishes

Job Titles

  • Blacksmith
  • Electroplater
  • Farrier
  • Metal Casting Trades Worker
  • Metal Polisher
  • Blacksmith

    Shapes bars, rods and blocks of metal by heating and hammering to produce or repair metal articles.

    Specialisations: Hammer Smith, Spring Maker, Tool Smith

  • Electroplater

    Controls plating processes and maintains solutions used to coat metal articles and other parts with non-ferrous metals.

    Specialisations: Anodiser, Electroformer, Galvaniser

  • Farrier

    Inspects, trims and shapes horses' hooves, and forms, fits and nails horseshoes.

  • Metal Casting Trades Worker

    Forms sand moulds and cores for the production of metal castings.

    Specialisations: Coremaker, Metal Moulder

  • Metal Polisher

    Polishes metal to impart smooth, reflective and other finishes.

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 2,300 workers Employment Size
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 80.1% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • Unavailable Average full-time
  • 43 years Average age
  • 9.9% female Gender Share

The number of Metal Casting, Forging & Finishing Trades grew moderately over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
from 2,300 in 2017 to 2,100 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 1,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Metal Casting, Forging & Finishing Trades work in many regions of Australia. Many work in Queensland or Victoria.
  • Industries: They work in many industries such as Manufacturing; Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (80.1%, higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Age: The average age is 43 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 9.9% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20072400
20083400
20093300
20102100
20113400
20122300
20132400
20142500
20152100
20161600
20172300
20222100

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing69.9
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing26.3
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services3.8

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateMetal Casting, Forging and Finishing Trades All Jobs Average
NSW22.631.6
VIC31.926.2
QLD30.019.7
SA0.06.7
WA15.510.8
TAS0.02.0
NT0.01.1
ACT0.01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketMetal Casting, Forging and Finishing Trades All Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.25.2
20-244.2-9.99.9
25-3421.9-23.623.6
35-4426.5-21.721.7
45-5420.6-20.820.8
55-595.6-8.88.8
60-6417.9-6.06.0
65 and Over3.3-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Automotive Manufacturing Sector, Manufacturing and Metal and Engineering VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Metal Casting, Forging & Finishing Trades Workers who are reliable, work well in a team and are hardworking.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Production and Processing

    83% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  2. Mathematics

    73% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  3. Education and Training

    72% Important

    Teaching and course design.

  4. Mechanical

    70% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  5. Engineering and Technology

    65% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-4022.00 - Forging Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Controlling Machines and Processes

    84% Important

    Operate machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

  2. Getting Information

    84% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Handling and Moving Objects

    82% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  4. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    81% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  5. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    81% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-4022.00 - Forging Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic.

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