Electricians design, assemble, install, test, commission, diagnose, maintain and repair electrical networks, systems, circuits, equipment, components, appliances and facilities for industrial, commercial and domestic purposes, and service and repair lifts, escalators and related equipment.

A Certificate III/IV is usually needed to work in this job and the majority of workers have this qualification. Training is most commonly through an apprenticeship which combines on-the-job training with the qualification. Registration or licensing is required.

Tasks

  • examining blueprints, wiring diagrams and specifications to determine sequences and methods of operation
  • measuring and laying out installation reference points
  • selecting, cutting and connecting wire and cable to terminals and connectors
  • using electrical and electronic test instruments to trace and diagnose faults
  • repairing and replacing faulty wiring and defective parts
  • positioning and installing electrical switchboards
  • connecting electrical systems to power supply
  • testing continuity of circuit
  • installing, testing and adjusting electric and mechanical parts of lifts

Job Titles

  • Electrician, or Electrical Fitter
  • Electrician (Special Class)
  • Lift Mechanic, or Lift Electrician
  • Electrician, or Electrical Fitter

    Installs, tests, connects, commissions, maintains and modifies electrical equipment, wiring and control systems. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Armature Winder, Electrical Contractor, Heavy Coil Winder, Railway Signal Electrician

  • Electrician (Special Class)

    Services and repairs intricate and complex electrical and electronic circuitry. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Lift Mechanic, or Lift Electrician

    Designs, installs, maintains, services and repairs electric and hydraulic passenger and freight lifts, escalators, moving walkways and other lift equipment. Registration or licensing is required.

Fast Facts

  • $1,400 Weekly Pay
  • 158,200 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 91.4% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 41.4 hours Average full-time
  • 34 years Average age
  • 2.1% female Gender Share

The number of Electricians grew strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow moderately over the next 5 years:
from 158,200 in 2017 to 169,200 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 31,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a very large occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Electricians work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Construction; Other Services; and Manufacturing.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,400 per week (higher than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (91.4%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%) showing part-time work may be hard to find.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41.4 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 34 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 2.1% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
2007115100
2008120500
2009128300
2010131300
2011137300
2012142300
2013134400
2014134600
2015155900
2016151400
2017158200
2022169200

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsElectriciansAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings14001230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Construction68.1
Other Services7.0
Manufacturing5.9
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services5.7
Other Industries13.3

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateElectriciansAll Jobs Average
NSW27.231.6
VIC21.926.2
QLD25.019.7
SA6.36.7
WA14.010.8
TAS2.02.0
NT2.01.1
ACT1.41.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketElectriciansAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-194.3-5.25.2
20-2416.8-9.99.9
25-3430.4-23.623.6
35-4420.1-21.721.7
45-5416.1-20.820.8
55-596.1-8.88.8
60-643.7-6.06.0
65 and Over2.5-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationElectriciansAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0-8.68.6
Bachelor degree1.2-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma8.3-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV67.6-18.918.9
Year 1217.3-18.718.7
Years 11 & 105.7-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

A Certificate III/IV is usually needed to work in this job and the majority of workers have this qualification. Training is most commonly through an apprenticeship which combines on-the-job training with the qualification. Registration or licensing is required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Electrotechnology VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Electricians who have good people skills, are reliable and have a strong work ethic.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Building and Construction

    87% Important

    Materials, methods, and the tools used to construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.

  2. Mechanical

    85% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  3. Mathematics

    78% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  4. English Language

    75% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Design

    75% Important

    Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 47-2111.00 - Electricians.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    82% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  2. Getting Information

    82% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    80% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  4. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    79% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  5. Handling and Moving Objects

    79% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 47-2111.00 - Electricians.

go to top